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Introducing #CuseCue on Instagram!

CareerSU1 Instagram image
By Kim Brown, ’06, Assistant Director for Alumni Programs

Can you believe it’s been two years since we launched @WorkingOrange? It’s our Twitter account featuring guest alumni tweeters sharing details of their workdays and offering advice to students and fellow alumni. We’re having a lot of fun with @WorkingOrange and today, we’re excited to announce another way our students can connect with our awesome alumni – via Instagram!

We’re calling it #CuseCue. Why #CuseCue? A cue is, simply put, a signal for action. Syracuse University alumni know the actions they took towards achieving career/life success, and students can take their cues from fellow members of our Orange family. A #CuseCue might be advice on standing out in an interview, tips on paying back college loans, thoughts on what makes a rockstar intern, insight on the most fulfilling career paths, and so much more. The goal is to keep each #CuseCue to 140 characters or less. Short and sweet advice from alumni who are the best at sharing it!

STUDENTS, here’s what to do/expect:

  • Follow @CareerSU1 on Instagram
  • Every Friday, we’ll introduce you to a new SU grad and you’ll find his/her #CuseCue in the photo’s description.
  • We’ll tag his/her Instagram, so you can connect directly with the alum, if you’d like.

ALUMNI, are you willing to share a #CuseCue?

  • Follow @CareerSU1 on Instagram
  • Email Magnolia Salas (jmsalas@syr.edu), our awesome Communications and Marketing Coordinator, with the following information:
    • Your name, SU graduation year, job title and employer
    • Your Instagram handle (if you have one and wouldn’t mind us sharing it)
    • A photo you’d like us to use on our Instagram on the day we feature your #CuseCue. It can be a cool picture of your office, a headshot, a fun photo showing your Orange personality, your SU graduation picture, you name it. Be creative if you’d like!
    • And, of course, your #CuseCue. Try to keep your advice for students/fellow alumni to 140 characters or less.

That’s it! We are excited to feature our alumni in this new way and can’t wait to read the awesome advice in each #CuseCue.

GO ORANGE!

Introducing #CuseCue on Instagram!

CareerSU1 Instagram image
By Kim Brown, ’06, Assistant Director for Alumni Programs

Can you believe it’s been two years since we launched @WorkingOrange? It’s our Twitter account featuring guest alumni tweeters sharing details of their workdays and offering advice to students and fellow alumni. We’re having a lot of fun with @WorkingOrange and today, we’re excited to announce another way our students can connect with our awesome alumni – via Instagram!

We’re calling it #CuseCue. Why #CuseCue? A cue is, simply put, a signal for action. Syracuse University alumni know the actions they took towards achieving career/life success, and students can take their cues from fellow members of our Orange family. A #CuseCue might be advice on standing out in an interview, tips on paying back college loans, thoughts on what makes a rockstar intern, insight on the most fulfilling career paths, and so much more. The goal is to keep each #CuseCue to 140 characters or less. Short and sweet advice from alumni who are the best at sharing it!

STUDENTS, here’s what to do/expect:

  • Follow @CareerSU1 on Instagram
  • Every Friday, we’ll introduce you to a new SU grad and you’ll find his/her #CuseCue in the photo’s description.
  • We’ll tag his/her Instagram, so you can connect directly with the alum, if you’d like.

ALUMNI, are you willing to share a #CuseCue?

  • Follow @CareerSU1 on Instagram
  • Email Magnolia Salas (jmsalas@syr.edu), our awesome Communications and Marketing Coordinator, with the following information:
    • Your name, SU graduation year, job title and employer
    • Your Instagram handle (if you have one and wouldn’t mind us sharing it)
    • A photo you’d like us to use on our Instagram on the day we feature your #CuseCue. It can be a cool picture of your office, a headshot, a fun photo showing your Orange personality, your SU graduation picture, you name it. Be creative if you’d like!
    • And, of course, your #CuseCue. Try to keep your advice for students/fellow alumni to 140 characters or less.

That’s it! We are excited to feature our alumni in this new way and can’t wait to read the awesome advice in each #CuseCue.

GO ORANGE!

The best career advice I ever received was…

Our Career Guide has advice too!

Compiled by Tracy Tillapaugh

If you’re reading this post, you most likely follow @CareerSU on twitter, and maybe you even follow me, @tracytilly. If you do, then you probably saw some questions that I posted a few weeks ago. While the original idea was to turn some crowd-sourced tweets into some suggestions for the Class of 2015, I received requests to share the info with everyone else too… so without further ado…

The best career advice I ever received was…

@cmnoguer I would say get out there, get involved and don’t be afraid of failure or rejection. Think of what you want to look back to.

@colormelauren: to use @LinkedIn!

@dgreichert: Don’t pepper your resume and hope for a bite. Research each company and tailor the resume to each specifically.

@dkaps89:  For freshmen: Start networking early & never stop. It’ll pay off when you’re job/internship hunting (or even when you’re not)

@joannagiansanti: It sounds hokey now, but when the book came out, “Do what you love and the money will follow” really rang true.

@kimincuse: “wheresoever you go, go with all your heart.” Confucius was smart… definitely applies to career!

@muruganpandian: Never stay in one place too long; especially when the opportunities to grow have evaporated.

@SyrMichael:  The best career advice I ever received was <— find something rewarding rather than focus on $$

@tjbasalla: chase the dream job, but find the career that gives you the best reality

Thank you to all of our contributors! What else would you add?

VLOG: Social Media and the Job Search with Alyssa Henry

By Tracy Tillapaugh

Syracuse University iSchool graduate student Alyssa Henry has been using Twitter for several years. She has had some great successes using Twitter and offers her tips to current students on what to tweet and how it can help with their career goals. Watch her discuss her Twitter strategies with Career Consultant Tracy Tillapaugh. Connect with @AlyssaHenry.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyQW3w9nzb0&w=560&h=315]

How has social media helped in your career development?

5 Ways to Leverage Twitter for Career Fair Success

by Rodney Fleming, SU ’13

Photo by The Daily Orange

So you want a job? Join the crowd – or don’t. With a few Twitter techniques, you can stand out from the masses and find success at your next career fair.

Do Your Homework
Going to a Career Fair is all about networking with potential employers. Why not get ahead of the game? Career Services offers lists of companies attending the fairs well in advance. Scout out the companies that are relevant to you and follow them on Twitter. Many larger companies such as Pepsi have their own job handles (@PepsiCoJOBS) that are there specifically for you to ask career questions.

Increase credibility and accountability
Take it a step further. Tweet at the companies you plan to speak with at the fair, expressing your enthusiasm for meeting their recruiters. Include your university’s Twitter handle and any other handles that make your tweet more credible. This not only shows you’re taking meeting them seriously but also makes them more accountable in responding.

Dialogue is Key
In my experience, it’s not difficult to find a few of the company’s PR and recruitment employees. A simple Twitter search “PR for X Company” can do wonders in the People Results. Drop these individuals a line that seeks a response. It’s great to express enthusiasm (as mentioned above) but when dealing with specific people, it’s better to create dialogue. Ask them how they got started with the company or what part of the company they work in. Their response will likely lead to further connections and helpful tips for securing the position.

Think of the Career Fair as an Aid
Now that you’ve built up steady conversations with companies via Twitter, apply the knowledge you’ve acquired to propel your conversations with their recruiters at the Career Fair. If you haven’t received a response from anyone in the company yet via Twitter, the recruiters might be able to give you their contact information. Use the fair as a place to ask detailed questions that won’t fit in 140 characters.

Follow Up
After meeting with recruiters at the career fair, use their business cards to seek them out online. Now that you’ve talked with companies and found those that truly pique your interest, let them know! Tweet at them along with a bit of what you talked about and that you’re interested. As mentioned before, be sure to include the handles of their company, the university’s career center, or any others that you find to be relevant.

Keep in mind, this advice only works if you are willing to put in the effort of creating a fantastic resume (which Career Services is here for!), being honest and memorable during career fairs, and willing to spark professional conversations on Twitter. Your extra effort on Twitter may very well may be the one thing that sets you apart from countless other faces and resumes!

5 Ways to Leverage Twitter for Career Fair Success

by Rodney Fleming, SU ’13

Photo by The Daily Orange

So you want a job? Join the crowd – or don’t. With a few Twitter techniques, you can stand out from the masses and find success at your next career fair.

Do Your Homework
Going to a Career Fair is all about networking with potential employers. Why not get ahead of the game? Career Services offers lists of companies attending the fairs well in advance. Scout out the companies that are relevant to you and follow them on Twitter. Many larger companies such as Pepsi have their own job handles (@PepsiCoJOBS) that are there specifically for you to ask career questions.

Increase credibility and accountability
Take it a step further. Tweet at the companies you plan to speak with at the fair, expressing your enthusiasm for meeting their recruiters. Include your university’s Twitter handle and any other handles that make your tweet more credible. This not only shows you’re taking meeting them seriously but also makes them more accountable in responding.

Dialogue is Key
In my experience, it’s not difficult to find a few of the company’s PR and recruitment employees. A simple Twitter search “PR for X Company” can do wonders in the People Results. Drop these individuals a line that seeks a response. It’s great to express enthusiasm (as mentioned above) but when dealing with specific people, it’s better to create dialogue. Ask them how they got started with the company or what part of the company they work in. Their response will likely lead to further connections and helpful tips for securing the position.

Think of the Career Fair as an Aid
Now that you’ve built up steady conversations with companies via Twitter, apply the knowledge you’ve acquired to propel your conversations with their recruiters at the Career Fair. If you haven’t received a response from anyone in the company yet via Twitter, the recruiters might be able to give you their contact information. Use the fair as a place to ask detailed questions that won’t fit in 140 characters.

Follow Up
After meeting with recruiters at the career fair, use their business cards to seek them out online. Now that you’ve talked with companies and found those that truly pique your interest, let them know! Tweet at them along with a bit of what you talked about and that you’re interested. As mentioned before, be sure to include the handles of their company, the university’s career center, or any others that you find to be relevant.

Keep in mind, this advice only works if you are willing to put in the effort of creating a fantastic resume (which Career Services is here for!), being honest and memorable during career fairs, and willing to spark professional conversations on Twitter. Your extra effort on Twitter may very well may be the one thing that sets you apart from countless other faces and resumes!