Syracuse University Career Services

The Internship Application Rollercoaster

vsBy Vanessa Salman ’17

It’s that time of year again — that’s right, it’s summer internship season.

You’ve perfected your resume after going to Career Services’ drop-in hours, made your cover letter a window into your professional soul, and submitted your application. A week later, you still haven’t heard back and you’re as antsy as could be. The worst starts to go through your head: do they hate me? Did they hire someone better than me? Did they even see my application?

I’m gonna stop you now – stop thinking this.

Take a breath. A deep, cleansing, mindful breath. This process is scary and competitive, but if you don’t get that coveted position at that fancy magazine or don’t intern with a notable Member of Congress, that is okay. There will be plenty of opportunities in the future, but for now, focus on finding something else for this summer.

Easier said than done, I know. But you have to keep a positive attitude and your head held high in these types of situations. The search, the application, and the wait time are all extremely nerve-wracking, however the reward of the experience is worth the temporary insanity – I promise! As cliche as this may sound, everything happens for a reason, so maybe not getting that internship will lead you to an experience you didn’t expect.

I say this all from personal experience. I went through this process just like everyone else, and let me tell you — it was emotionally draining. Applying to internships, especially those with larger organizations, make you feel like a number. You constantly refresh your email and just hope that there’s something about you that stands out among the hundreds or thousands of other numbers in the applicant pool. If you don’t get that internship you’ve been vying for, explore other options.

I applied to quite a few internships this summer, ranging from consulting firms, to various federal agencies, to congressional offices, and didn’t receive any good news. After encountering many dead ends, I decided to explore other options other than internships for the summer. I am so glad I did this, as I received a job opportunity for something that I hope to do post-graduation. As bummed as I am that I won’t be interning in Washington, DC with the rest of my friends this summer, I am happy with the way things have turned out, and it’s all because my summer didn’t go according to plan.

There are so many ways to find other job or internship opportunities (no, I’m not just saying that). LinkedIn, Indeed, and Internships.com are just a few means of finding opportunities online. Play around with the keywords you use to find more results.  Also, Syracuse students have an advantage because we have access to OrangeLink, which gives you access to job and internship postings, in addition to an employer directory. How cool is that?

Instead of sulking, it’s best to spring into action, and search for something else to do with your summer. You won’t regret it.

Need help with making the most of your summer? Call our office to schedule a phone, Skype, or in-person appointment, at 315-443-3616!

Social Media as a Career Skill

Using social media to build your career

By Emilee Smith G’16

In our digital age, social media is a highly sought-after skill. Although many of us are familiar with social media on a personal level, there is much value in using the platforms in a professional manner.

But with so many platforms and an abundance of information, where do you begin? Below are 5 tips and tricks that can help you improve your social media presence and knowledge in a way that will impress your future employers:

Be Professional. Perhaps the most obvious, it is exceedingly important that you keep all of your profiles professional. Even Facebook, which most people feel is more “personal,” should demonstrate a certain level of professionalism and possess a smart narrative. One of the first things your employer will do before hiring is look you up on social media, so make sure they like what they see!

Develop Your Personal Brand. You are uniquely you! Be sure that your personal brand is consistent throughout all of your profiles. One way to do this is by keeping your voice and personality constant.

Engage. Whether it is LinkedIn or Twitter, be sure you are following the companies you are interested in and respectfully connecting with influencers in your industry. It is called social networking for a reason, after all!

Be Proactive. Certain platforms, such as Twitter and WordPress, have a tendency of intimidating new users. Don’t be afraid! The only way to improve your skills and learn is by diving in. Being proactive and having a thorough understanding of all of the major platforms will make you much more marketable after graduation.

Stay Relevant. Publications such as Smart Brief on Social Business are free subscriptions that publish the newest social media developments. Reading publications such as this not only improve your knowledge on professional social media use, but also showcase your desire to learn more about the industry and developing trends.

While sometimes overwhelming, our social world is a blessing. Never before have we been able to network, engage and learn like we can today. Embracing these tips today will undoubtedly make you a better job candidate tomorrow. So good luck, and stay social!

The Most Future-Proof Career Advice Ever

Marina will take over @WorkingOrange on Thursday, October 22.

By Marina Zarya, ’11; G ’13, Time Inc., Video Producer, Branding + Culture

Now that I’ve got your attention with my very-catchy headline, I’ll warn you that the actual advice part of this post will be underwhelming.

Ready?

My advice to you, eager Syracuse University student, is BE KIND.

Yes, that’s it. The job you’ll have soon does not exist yet, and your skills will keep evolving to meet market demands. What won’t change is how you should treat people. And if this is the part where you’re clicking off the page, that’s OK, you’ve read the most important part and I hope it sticks. If you’re enjoying my snippy prose, you’ll be pleased to note that I’ve prepared a few examples to illustrate what I mean.

/bē/ verb; Exist
/kīnd/ adjective; Of Kin, gracious, congenial, altruistic, accommodating

Put the two words together and they mean to exist in empathy, act with integrity, humility, and grace. This is a way of being. A state of mind that everyone is capable of tapping into and effectively living in. Please don’t misinterpret this as a suggestion to be lovey-dovey 100% of the time or to let people walk over you.

“Be Kind” doesn’t mean “Be Nice”. Nice guys (or gals) finish last for a reason. Niceness is short-lived and stems from a need for immediate approval (and therefore comes from insecurity). Niceness implies an alternative (usually selfish) agenda, and is a disingenuous approach to relationships. Kindness is being aware of others; their feelings, needs, and time. It means being confident in your ability to empathize, or help if need be. It means adding value to interactions and relationships, not taking away from them by being self-serving. Here are a few ways to do this.

Be Kind:

  1. To *everyone* you meet.

As far as your career is concerned, you just never know where you’ll see the person again. Every single job or freelance gig I’ve ever had (including the one in which I decorated cupcakes in a bakeshop window during a summer in high school), I got because I was kind to someone, not realizing they held a key to my future employment.

My favorite quote on this subject is one that I learned of in grad school by the great Dr. Maya Angelou: “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Be kind to your teammates. People love working with kind people, and certainly remember them when other co-working opportunities come up.

As I’m sure you’re well aware, networking is the utmost important part of finding work. Interpret this as your chance to be kind. For one, be kind enough to get the person’s name and position right when you email them. Be kind to follow up, to demonstrate that you appreciated a new connection’s time. Be kind and do your research – understanding the person’s background will lead to a productive conversation and no wasted time. Mostly, be genuinely interested in what they’re doing, and don’t start the relationship with “I’m looking for a job at your company”.

  1. To yourself.

I learned the hard way. As the former reigning queen of caffeinated all-nighters in Bird Library and Newhouse Photo Labs, I can attest to the severely negative impacts of disrespecting your body’s needs for sleep, healthy food and exercise. I won’t preach too much on this point, for fear of sounding like a hypocrite. Part of being a productive adult is learning to manage the fine balance of your own well being, whatever combination of factors it is for you. This is probably harder than finding a job, but is crucial to your success. Science (and Arianna Huffington) suggest that getting enough sleep is the most important thing you can do to take care of your brain.

“Be kind” applies to negative self-talk, too. Yes, we all fall back on deadlines, procrastinate doing laundry, or forget to send emails. These things happen. Guilt-tripping yourself over past indiscretions or behavioral patterns that you may have inadvertently formed will not help you change them. In fact, bad-mouthing yourself in your head activates your brain’s reward center, making your biological self think that you’re having a great time beating yourself up – making the feedback loop of negativity a “fun”​ habit.

  1. Online. 

Just because you don’t see the person you are writing to does not mean that you don’t have to be kind. Write carefully thought-out emails that get right to the point, and if something is too long for an email, pick up the phone (old school, I know). Being kind online also means being kind to your image online – when you’re job-searching, recruiters will rifle through your tweets, Instagram posts, and anything really. Do yourself justice by portraying your professional self accurately.

     4. To your community. 

In the near future, you’ll be in a position to offer career guidance, or recommend a classmate for a role you see opening up at your company. Be kind. Pay it forward.

Speaking of which, current juniors and seniors should apply to my company’​s (Time Inc.) Summer Internship & Fellowship Programs. The preferred deadline is December 1, which is sooner than you think.

Graduating seniors and grad students should check out the Careers page. We’re constantly looking for new talent to join the company.

​We also post frequent updates and job alerts on InstagramLinkedIn, and Twitter, keep in touch with us there!

————————————————————

Marina Zarya works at Time Inc. as the Video Producer for Branding + Culture. She did both her BS and MS at S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, in Advertising and Multimedia, Photography and Design, respectively. While at Syracuse University she was General Manager at WERW Real College Radio, an Engagement Fellow, Remembrance Scholar, News21 Fellow and Bayliss Scholar.

Top Tips to Make the Most of Your Internship

By Jennifer Pluta and Lucy Rodgers

Internship panel hosted by the Lubin House and Syracuse University Career Services
Internship panel hosted by the Lubin House and Syracuse University Career Services

A few weeks ago, Syracuse University in NYC hosted a program in partnership with Career Services called “Making the Most of Your Summer Internship.” Attendees heard from a fantastic panel of alumni, including:

Josh Books ’11, Nielsen Catalina Solutions
Daniel Greenberg ’13, MediaLink
Josh Levy ’10, William Morris Endeavor
Pamela Medina ’13, General Assembly
Ciara Schoenauer ’14, Fullscreen

These recent alumni from various industries and fields provided their perspectives on how to have a successful internship in New York and elsewhere.

Here is what they had to say:

  1. What we hear most from employers is that they wish interns were more proactive. They encouraged everyone to follow the advice, “be a go-getter.”
  1. If you experience any “down time,” don’t wait for direction. Instead, look for assignments and present ideas.
  1. Be sure to take advantage of your resources because the connections you make at your internship can definitely go a long way in the future.
  1. You drive yourself and that itself is motivation. Even if you make a mistake and you may get discouraged, keep going.
  1. Treat your internship seriously. Treat it like a job. For example, go beyond your assigned responsibilities and ask to sit in on meetings.
  1. Your connection with Syracuse University is huge. You can see all 50,000 alumni who call New York City home on LinkedIn. So, use those Orange connections!
  1. When you are trying to network and make a connection, a great way to end an email is to ask “if there is ever any advice that you can give me, please reach out.”
  1. Don’t ask someone you are trying to connect with to meet for coffee and then expect them to do all the talking. Be prepared and ask insightful questions.
  1. Be sure to attend any professional development opportunities or networking events within the organization where you’re interning. Local events are great, too.
  1. Get and stay connected with fellow Syracuse University student and interns in order to build your network.
  1. After the internship, make sure to maintain your connections through emails, thank you notes, or holiday cards.

Check out all of the tweets from the event for a full re-cap of the evening.

For more advice on how to make the most out of your internship or if you are still seeking a summer internship, Career Services can help – call 315-443-3616 to make an appointment today!

How to Research Companies for #SUCareerWeek

By Magnolia Salas ’12

Explore your options during Spring Career Week
Explore your options during Spring Career Week

Syracuse University Career Week is next week! Be sure to leave a good impression on recruiters by doing your research before you step foot in Goldstein Auditorium for any of the fairs.

No matter what fair you plan on attending, take a look at what companies will be on campus recruiting. Knowing what companies will be present will help you know which companies you want to approach.

Once you have your target companies, take a look at their available positions (you can do that right through OrangeLink by clicking on the company you’re interested in). We provide an overview of the company, their available positions, and even their website to help you prepare. Once you’ve figured out what positions they are hiring for and if those positions match your skills and interests, it’s time to dig a bit further into the company by:

Visiting their website
It’s a good idea to visit the company’s website and to get to know the culture of the company to know if it aligns with where you would like to work. Want more research ideas? Check out our researching companies’ page on our website. We provide links to Vault, WetFeet, and GlassDoor which can all aid in your getting a better understanding of a company.

Looking through their social media
You can get a good idea of their culture by reading their blog, as well as checking out their Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Facebook pages. Not sure what to keep an eye out for? See what articles they post, if they provide any advice and insights into their company or their staff and what makes a good candidate. Sometimes companies even host Twitter chats where you can get even more insight.

Reaching out to alumni and contacts in the company
Feeling bold? If you know someone who works at the company of your choice or will be on campus recruiting, reach out to them and ask them some questions about the company to gain more insights. You can even do a LinkedIn search via the Alumni tool and research alumni who work in the industry or company, as well.

As you do your research, write down questions you have about the company, opportunity, or industry to ask the recruiter during the fair or in a follow-up e-mail. In addition, continue building rapport with a company by attending an information session if they host one.

Good luck with your research and we hope to see you at the Career Fair on February 3 taking place in Goldstein Auditorium (Schine) from 12:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.!

Mark Your Calendars for Spring Career Week!

Syracuse University Career Week will take place February 2-5.

As the fall semester winds down and you’re getting ready to head home, we just wanted to wish you a great, well-deserved break and let you know that it’s never too early to begin preparing for the spring recruiting season.

Mark these dates in your calendars!

Diversity in the Workplace: February 2, 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Panasci Lounge, Schine
Syracuse University Spring Career Fair: February 3, 12:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Goldstein Auditorium, Schine
Engineering Career Connections Fair: February 4, 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., Panasci Lounge, Schine
Whitman Spring Career Fair: February 4, 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m., Goldstein Auditorium, Schine
iSchool iCareer Day: February 5, 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., Goldstein Auditorium, Schine
Environmental Career Fair: (time and location TBD)
Nonprofit & Government Career Fair: February 27, 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., Panasci Lounge, Schine

Enjoy your break and we look forward to seeing you back on campus in 2015!

From Modern Presidency to Providing Presidential Protection

By Kim Brown, Assistant Director for Alumni Programs

As a student at Syracuse University, Aaron Rittgers always looked forward to Modern Presidency class with Professor Margaret Susan Thompson. Little did he know that ten years later, he’d have a job that would give him a front row seat to the President of the United States, the Vice President, First Ladies, and other prominent world leaders.

Major Aaron Rittgers '03 speaks to Air Force ROTC cadets.
Major Aaron Rittgers ’03 speaks to Air Force ROTC cadets.

Rittgers is a Major in the United States Air Force. As a student at Syracuse University, he was in the Air Force ROTC. He graduated from SU in 2003 and is now Commander of the 811th Security Forces Squadron at Joint Base Andrews. What does that mean? His squadron is responsible for guarding Air Force One when it is on Andrews, for protecting Air Force Two all over the world, and for protecting the President, Vice President, First Lady, and other leaders while they are on Joint Base Andrews. That means Rittgers has some insider information on President Obama’s golf game! Andrews is one of the President’s favorite place to golf.

Major Rittgers visited campus at the end of October as part of the Alumni Speaker Series. He spoke to the Modern Presidency class, to the Air Force ROTC cadets, to a group of parents on campus for Family Weekend, and more. The timing of his trip also coincided with a visit from General Martin Dempsey, who awarded Major Rittgers with his Bronze Star Medal after a yearlong tour in Iraq. Rittgers has done seven tours and spent 1100 days in the Middle East!

Since Rittgers works so closely on protecting Air Force Two, he’s had several interactions with fellow Syracuse University alum Vice President Joe Biden. When asked about those interactions, Rittgers said that Biden is one of the most down-to-earth guys you could meet – and that the two enjoy chatting about ‘CUSE. Major Rittgers also told ROTC cadets how proud he is of them for choosing to join ROTC in a post-9/11 world.

It’s always an honor to welcome Syracuse University alumni back to campus to share their career stories, and we’re especially grateful to Major Rittgers for sharing so much of his time and talent with our students!

Meet Dan Olson-Bang, Associate Director, Graduate Student Services

Dan Olson-Bang
Meet Dan Olson-Bang!

Our new Associate Director just joined the office on Monday, November 3! We thought this would be a great time to introduce him to you, so we asked him to answer some questions about himself.

Slice of Advice: Tell us why you’re so excited to start working at Career Services/SU and/or why are you excited to be in Syracuse?
Dan Olson-Bang: One of the things that I look forward to in my role in Career Services is to meet with a wide variety of graduate students from across SU’s campus. I really like to hear about the kinds of projects that people are working on and to learn about different disciplines. My own interests run toward the eclectic (I really like to learn about the science of cooking and I enjoy biology, for instance), so I hope to learn some cool things from everyone! I also think I am going to learn quite a bit from everyone in the Career Services office, which is really exciting to me.

I also look forward to spending more time outdoors than I could where I used to live. Since I know about snowy Syracuse, I’m looking forward to learning how to ski. But I also like to camp and hike, which should be a bit easier than it was for me near New York City.

SOA: Tell us your favorite hobby.
DOB: Cycling. I love everything about bikes: I like to fix them, I like to have them, and I like to ride them. I particularly like old ones. I have a classic Italian racing bike from 1963 that I got at a garage sale that is my pride and joy (even if parts periodically fall off of it). I also follow professional racing like the Tour de France. My dream is to get a “snow bike” as they call them, which is a mountain bike with huge tires, to ride in Syracuse’s snowy winters!

SOA: Tell us an interesting fact or skill you have.
DOB: I was born in Germany. People always ask if I was an Army kid, since I came to America at 18 months, but my dad was an opera singer, singing in Germany and Austria. You could say that he is a recovering opera singer now. As for me, I play a few instruments myself (badly), and am a music lover like everyone else in my family.

SOA: I f you could have any superpower what would it be?
DOB: I can tell you what superpower I would like to have: speed! I love going fast on my bike, so it would always be great to go just a little faster. A more dubious superpower that I have been told that I have is an ability to spot grammatical errors at a hundred feet, a skill that I will hope to use with all those cover letters I’ll read in Career Services.

Sophomore Surge: Part 2!

By Christina Faulkner, Career Advisor, G’16

Checklist

Last month, we mentioned some options for gaining experience and exploring your interests to help prepare you for success. This month, we’ve got a few more tips to help you discover paths and lead you toward exciting experiences and post-graduate happiness:

Reflect on Strengths, Interests, Goals, and Values

Notice when you do particularly well in a class discussion, delegate tasks to team members, or any other natural talent you might have and write it down. Think about your goals and what type of environment you’d like to work in. This will help you be prepared to answer interview questions with confidence but will also make searching and deciding easier.

Job Shadowing

If you have a few different ideas about careers you’re interested in, consider job shadowing to learn more and to imagine yourself doing the job every day. Alumni can be great people to ask, or you can “virtually job shadow” an SU alum by following @workingorange on Twitter.

Career Conversations

Connect with family friends, alumni, or anyone who does something you have interest in. Ask them about their job and what they like and dislike about. The best perspectives usually come from someone who lives it. We can help you find people to chat with!

Establish Relationships with Faculty

Faculty are a great resource! Get to know them and their background, you can learn so much outside of the classroom from them too! Additionally, they might be willing to give you a reference or recommendation, proofread your resume, or refer you to a contact.

Attend Seminars on Campus

Keep an eye out for seminars, speakers, or events on campus where you can learn and network. Approach a speaker or presenter after to ask questions and learn more about your field. There are so many to choose from!

Mentor and be Mentored

Start mentoring freshman via fullCIRCLE or other mentoring programs and you can also be mentored by staff, faculty, alumni and employers in the area. Or find a mentor in the area after you connect with someone in a career conversation. Mentors can be caring and motivating and will tell us what we can improve on if they are a good match. Ask us how to develop a mentoring relationship organically.

Already doing all this? That’s awesome! Feel free to come in and chat with us for more ideas!

Summer's not quiet in Career Services!

By Magnolia Salas

Enjoy your summer Happy summer! Your dedication to your classwork, campus involvement, internship and work experiences, and long hours have paid off and now you get to enjoy a little relaxation. As you sink into the summer months, we wanted to reach out and let you know Career Services is still here. As you explore internships, co-ops, graduate school, and career possibilities, we are here to help you make sense of it all. We also wanted to let you know of a few events taking place this summer to keep on your radar.

Every summer, Syracuse University’s Alumni Association hosts SUccess in the City  networking events, which help current students, recent grads, and alumni to connect. They’re amazing opportunities to meet Syracuse University alumni who are established in their careers and are ready to help you meet your professional goals.

If you live in or near any of these cities, join us for conversation, new friends, and food:

Philadelphia: May 29
Boston: June 3
Washington, D.C.: June 4
NYC: June 23, 24, 25 (open to classes of 2012, 2013, 2014 due to space limitations)
Atlanta: July 23
Miami: July 24
San Francisco: July 31
Chicago: Date to be determined

If you are in NYC this summer, keep an eye out on the professional events hosted at Lubin House. From apartment hunting help to resume writing to networking opportunities, there is a little something for everyone.

Apartment Hunting Tips: Google+ Hangout, May 21, 12:15 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Resume Writing: May 28, 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Making the Most of Your Summer Internship: June 3, 6:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

In addition, it’s never too early to start thinking about participating in fall career week events from September 24 – October 2:

Local Internship Fair: Wednesday, September 24, Panasci Lounge
Resumania: Friday, September 26, 235 Schine
iCareer Day: Monday, September 29, iSchool
Syracuse University Career & Graduate School Fair: Tuesday, September 30, The Dome
Diversity in the Workplace: Tuesday, September 30, The Dome
Engineering Career Connections Fair:
Wednesday, October 1, Goldstein Auditorium
Whitman Career Fair: Wednesday, October 1, Goldstein Auditorium
Law School Information Fair: Thursday, October 2, Panasci Lounge

If the fall semester seems too far away, you can always reach out to us this summer to answer pressing questions or to prepare for next year. We are available all summer via phone, Skype, and in-person, both for our drop-in sessions and full hour-long appointments.

Have a great summer and we hope to see you in 235 Schine this fall!

If you’re a member of the Class of 2014, congratulations! If you have figured out your post-graduation plans, please share your good news with us by filling out this short survey.