Lauren Wannermeyer

Senior Session Recap: Social Media Networking

By Lauren Wannermeyer, Career Services Intern

Dan Klamm and Kim Brown presented a very informative session on Social Media Networking for the last Senior Session on Wednesday, 2/22.

Did you know that 75% of employers search online for job candidates? That’s huge! A little known fact is that social media profiles are generally the top results when you search someone’s name online. If you are on any social networks, employers will be able to find them (try it out for yourself!). Kim went on to explain how you can use that to your advantage. It has been said that “If you’re not on LinkedIn, you do not exist professionally.” When used correctly, LinkedIn can be one of the first results that comes up in a search for your name. Be sure to make your LinkedIn the best possible representation of you and customize your URL to contain your name.

Use 'CuseConnect to network with alumni!

Once you’re all set up on LinkedIn, it can be a powerful tool (even without paying for a professional account). You can use it to find Syracuse University alumni who work at companies you like and even connect to someone you might not otherwise and apply for positions. The trick is to join groups and follow companies to get to know individuals in your future field. Start with the Syracuse University Alumni Network group (yes, you can join if you’re a current student) and check out ‘CuseConnect on the Career Services website to see if you’re interested in joining. After a short orientation, you can get all set up to connect with alumni who are looking to help you out. If you want more help setting up LinkedIn and learning how to use it, don’t hesitate to stop by Career Services drop-ins!

Dan went on to talk about how Twitter can help you connect to potential employers. Dan said that “The benefit of Twitter is that there are no walls.” You can reply to anyone, even if they’re not following you and they will see it and more than likely respond. The caveat is that you have to keep your account public if you want to use Twitter for networking purposes. You can connect to people that you might not otherwise have any other way of connecting with. A great way to do this is by participating in a Twitter chat. There are multiple ones held regularly. All different kinds of people attend. If you find one with a topic that interests you, you can connect with other like-minded people and possibly make connections that could one day land you a job. You wouldn’t be able to successfully accomplish this if your account is private because then people would not even be able to see your replies unless you’ve allowed them to follow you. There is much more to learn about Twitter, but try it out and get connected to the millions of people already tweeting!

Social networks get a bad reputation when people use them inappropriately. Representing yourself well on social networks can make all the difference in your job search. It can help employers get an idea about what kind of person you are before even meeting you. Be sure to keep this in mind as you’re using social networks for recreation purposes!

Don’t forget – TOMORROW, February 29, Career Services and the Office of Multicultural Affairs are hosting ‘Diversity: A Dinner & Dialogue.’  Take this opportunity to engage in lively discussion about diversity in the workplace, connect with employers, and eat some delicious dinner!  STUDENTS MUST RSVP ON ORANGELINK.

Senior Session Recap: Social Media Networking

By Lauren Wannermeyer, Career Services Intern

Dan Klamm and Kim Brown presented a very informative session on Social Media Networking for the last Senior Session on Wednesday, 2/22.

Did you know that 75% of employers search online for job candidates? That’s huge! A little known fact is that social media profiles are generally the top results when you search someone’s name online. If you are on any social networks, employers will be able to find them (try it out for yourself!). Kim went on to explain how you can use that to your advantage. It has been said that “If you’re not on LinkedIn, you do not exist professionally.” When used correctly, LinkedIn can be one of the first results that comes up in a search for your name. Be sure to make your LinkedIn the best possible representation of you and customize your URL to contain your name.

Use 'CuseConnect to network with alumni!

Once you’re all set up on LinkedIn, it can be a powerful tool (even without paying for a professional account). You can use it to find Syracuse University alumni who work at companies you like and even connect to someone you might not otherwise and apply for positions. The trick is to join groups and follow companies to get to know individuals in your future field. Start with the Syracuse University Alumni Network group (yes, you can join if you’re a current student) and check out ‘CuseConnect on the Career Services website to see if you’re interested in joining. After a short orientation, you can get all set up to connect with alumni who are looking to help you out. If you want more help setting up LinkedIn and learning how to use it, don’t hesitate to stop by Career Services drop-ins!

Dan went on to talk about how Twitter can help you connect to potential employers. Dan said that “The benefit of Twitter is that there are no walls.” You can reply to anyone, even if they’re not following you and they will see it and more than likely respond. The caveat is that you have to keep your account public if you want to use Twitter for networking purposes. You can connect to people that you might not otherwise have any other way of connecting with. A great way to do this is by participating in a Twitter chat. There are multiple ones held regularly. All different kinds of people attend. If you find one with a topic that interests you, you can connect with other like-minded people and possibly make connections that could one day land you a job. You wouldn’t be able to successfully accomplish this if your account is private because then people would not even be able to see your replies unless you’ve allowed them to follow you. There is much more to learn about Twitter, but try it out and get connected to the millions of people already tweeting!

Social networks get a bad reputation when people use them inappropriately. Representing yourself well on social networks can make all the difference in your job search. It can help employers get an idea about what kind of person you are before even meeting you. Be sure to keep this in mind as you’re using social networks for recreation purposes!

Don’t forget – TOMORROW, February 29, Career Services and the Office of Multicultural Affairs are hosting ‘Diversity: A Dinner & Dialogue.’  Take this opportunity to engage in lively discussion about diversity in the workplace, connect with employers, and eat some delicious dinner!  STUDENTS MUST RSVP ON ORANGELINK.

Job Search Secrets: A Senior Session Recap

Follow along at #GetHired12 on Twitter!

By Lauren Wannermeyer, Intern at Syracuse University Career Services

Last week, Career Services’ Associate Director Chuck Reutlinger shared his best job searching secrets.  He brings a unique perspective to the job search as a former recruiter and outplacement consultant who has worked in the Career Services office for several years. Here’s a re-cap of what we learned!

Just in Time
Reutlinger started by clarifying that most companies take a “just in time” approach to their hiring strategies. They don’t often plan in advance. Companies like to hire people they know or people they have met previously thanks to referrals. Interning allows you to meet people and build a relationship that can get you connected to companies you could potentially work for or professionals who could potentially refer you to their contacts. Not only should you be completing internships, but you should consider networking an important step to meeting people. Many companies give their employees monetary incentives for referring or recruiting new talent. Even completing a post-graduation internship can be a great foot in the door to a great company for your first real-world job.

Work Locally
Another important note about the “just in time” approach to hiring is that companies often look for local candidates. If you’re looking for a career in a specific city, you should keep in touch with friends and family in the area. They might be the first to hear about opportunities and can also help you adjust to life in a new place. 70-80% of positions are not advertised and, even then, many of them are not widely advertised. So if you know what job you’re looking for, put out feelers early. You never know when a posting might go out or a friend or relative might hear of something.

Job Advertisements
You also should be wary of job advertisements. Many times, postings are not entirely up to date; even if they are, the job might not actually be available. In order to aid their “just in time” hiring approach, companies like to have a supply of resumes on hand for potential future openings. So even if you send in your resume to an advertised position, there are still no guarantees that it will even be considered. Frustrating, right? Be sure to make sure your resume is scannable and contains the key words that companies might be looking for (hint: these works can be found in the job description!).

Don’t forget: this week’s Senior Session on Networking: Why #SocialMedia is a Must, featuring @kimincuse and @danklamm, will be held TOMORROW, Wednesday, 2/22, at 3:30pm in Hall of Languages 207. Questions? Email ttillapa@syr.edu or tweet @tracytilly. Can’t make it? Follow along on Twitter by searching #GetHired12.

There are just a few short months before graduation so make sure to stop in for a drop in or make an appointment to talk about your individual job search (or graduate school application). We’re happy to help as you transition into the real world.

Resumes and Cover Letters: a Senior Session Recap

By Lauren Wannermeyer, Intern at Syracuse University Career Services

Our Senior Sessions help you to prepare!

Did you miss Career Services’ first Senior Session on Resumes, Cover Letters, and preparing for a Career Fair? Here’s what you missed!

Tracy Tillapaugh and Shannon Feeney from Career Services presented on how to make our resume and cover letters stand out among the stack and how to make an impression at a Career Fair. The theme of the session was pretty obvious. To get a job (or even just get an interview), standing out is key.

Tracy kicked off the hour with a brief workshop on resumes, starting with the job description.

Glassdoor.com

The job description
You’d be surprised to hear how many people do not even completely read through a job description before applying for a job. This is an imperative step. If you don’t completely survey the job description, it’s impossible to be strategic with your resume. The idea is to put the most applicable work experience at the top, where it is most likely to be read. It may sound tedious to tailor your resume to every job you apply for, but if you just have a few separate sections (specialized experience, leadership experience, etc.) you can organize them based on the requested skills and experience on the job description.

Recruiters say they pay most attention to the top half and the bottom three lines of a resume. Be strategic with how you place your work/internship experience and your special skills.

We have all heard that resumes shouldn’t be more than one page. With this in mind, don’t be afraid to weed out irrelevant information. You want the experience on your resume to be relevant to the job you are applying for. This might mean taking some things out. While all of your clubs and involvement in college might have been formative, it might not be applicable. Keep this in mind.

Action Words
The next tip is to focus on action words. You should start every bullet point with a verb to kick off your description. Recruiters cannot get the full picture of your experience from a simple listing of the company you worked for and your position there. You should use verbs to explain your duties and responsibilities and try to relate them back to duties and responsibilities listed in the description of the job you’re applying for.

An Objective
Tracy’s final tip had to do with listing an objective. Think of your objective as a headline. It’s a brief statement of what you want to do. It helps recruiters clarify why they have your resume. It’s especially helpful when you’re at a career fair. Company reps are often at fairs recruiting for a variety of positions and they will have a hard time remembering why you spoke with them if your resume does not make your objective clear. An objective statement is completely optional, but it’s something to consider if you’re set in what kind of position you aspire to receive after graduation.

As the workshop continued, Tracy spoke about cover letters. Cover letters are often even more frustrating than resumes. They need to be even more specific to the position you are applying to. If there is one key point when it comes to cover letters, it’s relevance. Examples also matter. You can use all the adjectives you want to describe yourself and what kind of worker you are but it will never have the same effect as an anecdote that displays why you possess all the qualities that they are looking for.

Research is a MUST before Career Fairs

Next, Shannon offered excellent tips on how to make the most of career fairs. Her first tip was to do your research. Find out what companies are attending, figure out what tables you’d most like to visit, have your resumes set to go with those companies in mind. Look up the company’s website and social media accounts. Be prepared to have a conversation with the recruiter. You should never go up to a table and say “Tell me about your company.” If you’re serious about applying for a job, you should be able to tell them about their company and why you’d make a good fit. OrangeLink is a great resource. It allows you to look up the companies that are attending, their website and what positions they are recruiting for. Use it!

Next Shannon advised to have your elevator pitch ready to go. Most of us have had to come up with one at some point or another in class. Your elevator pitch should be brief and informative. It should have flavors of your personality and be memorable. These things are hard to achieve. If you have trouble coming up with your elevator pitch, Career Services can help!

If you’re nervous about talking to your dream company, practice. Start by going to a company you’re a little less interested in to warm up. You might find after working out the kinks with a less stressful company, you’re ready to go. Finally, don’t forget to apply. You can’t apply for jobs at Career Fairs, but you find out about a lot of opportunities. Maximize them by applying. You’d be surprised by how many people don’t!

Don’t miss the next Senior Session on Wednesday, February 15th at 3:30 p.m. in Hall of Languages room 207. Chuck Reutlinger will offer a workshop on Job Searching Secrets. Then, on Wednesday, February 22nd, same time, same place, Kim Brown and Dan Klamm will help you to understand how social media plays a role in your job search and why you MUST be on LinkedIn. RSVP on Orange Link!

How SU Greek life prepares students for the workplace

By Lauren Wannermeyer, SU ’12

On a campus this large, the attraction of Greek life is pretty obvious. It’s a great way to get involved, meet new people and make friends that will be there for you forever. But there is one benefit that might not be immediately apparent: being Greek is a great way to prepare for your future goals in your career.

Any given Greek organization has a scaffolding of positions within the organization. These positions can range from President, various Vice Presidential positions that have specific responsibilities, and even coordinators or chair people who help execute the various aspects of fraternity and sorority life.

Through immersing yourself in Greek life, you gain experience working on teams. More than likely, these teams are full of enthusiastic and strong personalities with a lot of ideas. You have deadlines to meet, tasks to finish, crises to deal with and 100 people counting on you to make things happen. Fraternities and sororities are much like many of the big companies out there that people hope to work for.

Additionally, you have access to a network of alumni who already consider you a brother or sister. The bond between current students and alumni is already pretty strong, but when you’re Greek, that transcends mere shared college experience and becomes fraternal.

In my sorority, I hold the position as the Vice President of Campus Relations. I have quite a few responsibilities that require going to weekly and monthly meetings. I have duties that could easily simulate the tasks I might face in a real job. I have the actual power to execute goals for my chapter and I will graduate knowing my contribution will have affected every woman in my organization. Now that I’m entering the winter of my time at Syracuse University, I’m currently on the job search. When I’m in interviews and prompted to explain why I’m qualified for any given position, I always call upon my Greek experience.

Like many students, I’ve also had internships and jobs, but the level of involvement that goes along with Greek life transcends the temporary experiences you garner through other outlets. When you go Greek, you dedicate your entire college experience to your chosen organization, in the best way possible. So even if you don’t achieve a leadership position, you automatically can show that you have the capacity for long-term dedication and commitment.  If you take that to the next level and do go for a leadership role, then that’s even more you can draw upon.

There are a lot of misconceptions associated with Greek life and it certainly is not for everyone. But if you’re looking for something to get involved with that will best mimic what it might be like to work at a corporation, consider Greek life. It offers a well-rounded experience with real responsibility and real results. And who knows: an alum from your fraternity or sorority might even be able to help you get your dream job one day!

Take a look at this video about the power of greek life, produced by the Office of Fraternity & Sorority Affairs:
[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWRmYy0UhMc&w=560&h=315]