Social Media

Spring Break Tips

Stop and smell the flowers AFTER following up on this advice!

By Jeff D’Andria, Graduate Assistant

At Career Services, we understand the importance of resting up during spring break, but here are a few small things you can do to make a gigantic impact on your future. After all, your future doesn’t take breaks.

Your spring break to do’s:

  1. Add one new person to your network. The best tool for researching and contacting persons of interest is LinkedIn. Check out two groups on LinkedIn: ‘Cuse Connect and the Syracuse University Alumni Network. Once you’re accepted to these groups, click on the “members” tab and identify people you’d like to contact for an informational interview. Outside of those two groups, you can utilize the “advanced” search function to find people that went to S.U. and  currently work at the companies you’re interested in. Reach out!
  2. Reconnect with one person in your network. After you make contacts, it’s important to keep in touch. Send an email to catch up by asking what they’ve been up to and be sure to inform them of your latest updates. There’s a big difference between being in touch three times a year vs. once a year. You don’t want to be “that person” asking for a favor after being completely out of touch. Check in!
  3. Apply to one position. If you’re graduating this May and looking for a job or simply need a summer internship, the time to apply is now. For the job search, check out indeed.com and many other job search engines on our website. For you internship seekers, NYJobsource lists companies and organizations to intern with in New York City. Here are a number of other internship sources on our website. And no matter what, remember to customize your resume and cover letter to the positions you’re applying for each time you apply.

After completing these to do’s you’ll have made one new contact, reconnected with another and applied to one dream opportunity. Get these things done and you’ll be way ahead of your competition that snoozed during the break.

We’ll be in the office over Spring Break so stop in if we can help! Drop Ins are Monday – Friday from 1-2:30pm and appointments are still available.

Senior Session Recap: Social Media Networking

By Lauren Wannermeyer, Career Services Intern

Dan Klamm and Kim Brown presented a very informative session on Social Media Networking for the last Senior Session on Wednesday, 2/22.

Did you know that 75% of employers search online for job candidates? That’s huge! A little known fact is that social media profiles are generally the top results when you search someone’s name online. If you are on any social networks, employers will be able to find them (try it out for yourself!). Kim went on to explain how you can use that to your advantage. It has been said that “If you’re not on LinkedIn, you do not exist professionally.” When used correctly, LinkedIn can be one of the first results that comes up in a search for your name. Be sure to make your LinkedIn the best possible representation of you and customize your URL to contain your name.

Use 'CuseConnect to network with alumni!

Once you’re all set up on LinkedIn, it can be a powerful tool (even without paying for a professional account). You can use it to find Syracuse University alumni who work at companies you like and even connect to someone you might not otherwise and apply for positions. The trick is to join groups and follow companies to get to know individuals in your future field. Start with the Syracuse University Alumni Network group (yes, you can join if you’re a current student) and check out ‘CuseConnect on the Career Services website to see if you’re interested in joining. After a short orientation, you can get all set up to connect with alumni who are looking to help you out. If you want more help setting up LinkedIn and learning how to use it, don’t hesitate to stop by Career Services drop-ins!

Dan went on to talk about how Twitter can help you connect to potential employers. Dan said that “The benefit of Twitter is that there are no walls.” You can reply to anyone, even if they’re not following you and they will see it and more than likely respond. The caveat is that you have to keep your account public if you want to use Twitter for networking purposes. You can connect to people that you might not otherwise have any other way of connecting with. A great way to do this is by participating in a Twitter chat. There are multiple ones held regularly. All different kinds of people attend. If you find one with a topic that interests you, you can connect with other like-minded people and possibly make connections that could one day land you a job. You wouldn’t be able to successfully accomplish this if your account is private because then people would not even be able to see your replies unless you’ve allowed them to follow you. There is much more to learn about Twitter, but try it out and get connected to the millions of people already tweeting!

Social networks get a bad reputation when people use them inappropriately. Representing yourself well on social networks can make all the difference in your job search. It can help employers get an idea about what kind of person you are before even meeting you. Be sure to keep this in mind as you’re using social networks for recreation purposes!

Don’t forget – TOMORROW, February 29, Career Services and the Office of Multicultural Affairs are hosting ‘Diversity: A Dinner & Dialogue.’  Take this opportunity to engage in lively discussion about diversity in the workplace, connect with employers, and eat some delicious dinner!  STUDENTS MUST RSVP ON ORANGELINK.

Senior Session Recap: Social Media Networking

By Lauren Wannermeyer, Career Services Intern

Dan Klamm and Kim Brown presented a very informative session on Social Media Networking for the last Senior Session on Wednesday, 2/22.

Did you know that 75% of employers search online for job candidates? That’s huge! A little known fact is that social media profiles are generally the top results when you search someone’s name online. If you are on any social networks, employers will be able to find them (try it out for yourself!). Kim went on to explain how you can use that to your advantage. It has been said that “If you’re not on LinkedIn, you do not exist professionally.” When used correctly, LinkedIn can be one of the first results that comes up in a search for your name. Be sure to make your LinkedIn the best possible representation of you and customize your URL to contain your name.

Use 'CuseConnect to network with alumni!

Once you’re all set up on LinkedIn, it can be a powerful tool (even without paying for a professional account). You can use it to find Syracuse University alumni who work at companies you like and even connect to someone you might not otherwise and apply for positions. The trick is to join groups and follow companies to get to know individuals in your future field. Start with the Syracuse University Alumni Network group (yes, you can join if you’re a current student) and check out ‘CuseConnect on the Career Services website to see if you’re interested in joining. After a short orientation, you can get all set up to connect with alumni who are looking to help you out. If you want more help setting up LinkedIn and learning how to use it, don’t hesitate to stop by Career Services drop-ins!

Dan went on to talk about how Twitter can help you connect to potential employers. Dan said that “The benefit of Twitter is that there are no walls.” You can reply to anyone, even if they’re not following you and they will see it and more than likely respond. The caveat is that you have to keep your account public if you want to use Twitter for networking purposes. You can connect to people that you might not otherwise have any other way of connecting with. A great way to do this is by participating in a Twitter chat. There are multiple ones held regularly. All different kinds of people attend. If you find one with a topic that interests you, you can connect with other like-minded people and possibly make connections that could one day land you a job. You wouldn’t be able to successfully accomplish this if your account is private because then people would not even be able to see your replies unless you’ve allowed them to follow you. There is much more to learn about Twitter, but try it out and get connected to the millions of people already tweeting!

Social networks get a bad reputation when people use them inappropriately. Representing yourself well on social networks can make all the difference in your job search. It can help employers get an idea about what kind of person you are before even meeting you. Be sure to keep this in mind as you’re using social networks for recreation purposes!

Don’t forget – TOMORROW, February 29, Career Services and the Office of Multicultural Affairs are hosting ‘Diversity: A Dinner & Dialogue.’  Take this opportunity to engage in lively discussion about diversity in the workplace, connect with employers, and eat some delicious dinner!  STUDENTS MUST RSVP ON ORANGELINK.

From Heroine to Human: my experience meeting Lindsay Adler

By Brian Brister, Graduate Student, Photography (Commercial Fashion)

As a child, every person dreams of meeting their hero, or in this case, heroine. This past Tuesday, I had the opportunity to make my dream come true thanks to Career ServicesAlumni Speaker Series.

Although Lindsay Adler hasn’t held that place in my mind since childhood, I have followed her work very closely for the past two to three years. A friend sent me a link to her blog with a note that said “Check this photographer out. This is going to be you one day.” Immediately, I was hooked. She’s incredibly creative and brings intense emotion to every image she creates.  She’s also very personable in her blog posts.

When I began looking into schools to attend to procure my Master’s degree, I immediately added Newhouse to my list because I knew that Lindsay had graduated from there and I wanted the opportunity to learn from the same professors who taught her. I obviously had other schools on my list, but Newhouse was at the top. Lindsay and I have spoken several times via Twitter (@brianbrister @lindsayadler) but had never met in person.

Tuesday evening, I had the opportunity to have dinner with her and to attend her lecture where she spoke about her journey thus far in the fashion photography world. I made a list of nearly 70 questions that I wanted to ask her, but immediately realized that would have turned into somewhat of an interrogation, so I decided to just ask 8-10 questions during the course of the evening. At dinner, we discussed the places she had been, the things she worked on, what she enjoyed photographing most, how she made the decision that she was financially and mentally ready to move to New York City and what she had done as a student to better prepare herself for life after graduation.

Brian Brister with Lindsay Adler

Lindsay’s lecture in Watson Theater was one of the best lectures I have been to. She offered us so much important information and was completely relatable the entire evening. After her lecture, there was a time for questions. Lindsay was willing to answer any question presented by the students and community. There was a wonderful crowd present for the event, and many were live-tweeting using the hashtag #AdlerSU. At the end of the evening, I was able to take a photo with Lindsay (above) and also meet her parents who drove from their home near Binghamton to hear her speak.

Prior to the event, Lindsay was a photographer who I held in highest regard in the fashion industry, but simply a name who I admired. After spending time with her and experiencing her boisterous personality and seeing her determination and love for photography in every movement she makes, my heroine has become human.

Interested in meeting and networking with Syracuse University alumni through Career Services’ Alumni Speaker Series? The Series continues on February 21st!

Lan Luan G ’04
Tuesday, February 21st
Reception 7:00 p.m., Event 7:30 p.m. Life Sciences 011 (Auditorium)

Lan is Senior Product Manager focusing on International Marketing for Microsoft’s Bing. We’re welcoming her back to campus during National Engineers Week, which is very exciting. Lan was born and raised in China and received her Master’s Degree from the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science. She will share advice on working for one of the world’s most recognizable companies, and will offer a unique perspective for our international students interesting in following her career path.

Theo Moll ’90
Tuesday, March 27th
7:30 p.m. Hall of Languages Room 500

Theo is Vice President of Keppler Speakers’ College and University Diversion. Keppler’s exclusive roster of national and international celebrities and experts represents many of the most in-demand speakers on the lecture circuit today. Theo should really appeal to members of University Union and all students interested in representing professional and celebrity speakers.

Brian Tarrant ’96
Wednesday, April 4th
Time/Location TBA

Brian is a Vice President at MC2 Events, Exhibits and Environments. He started his career in sales. It was his company, MC2, that designed the Melo Center’s Hall of Fame that greets visitors. We are hoping to hold his event in the Melo Center, to give students a rare opportunity to see it. You can read more about Brian in this feature article from SU Magazine.

Sales: So Much More Than Cold-Calling

By Shannon Feeney

Cold-calling is so last century! (flickr / zigazou76)

There seems to be a stigma around the word “sales” when it comes to job seekers.  The images that come to mind are of cold-calling for new clients, salaries based solely on commission, and forcing people to buy something they don’t want.  I am hoping this blog post will help debunk some myths and shed some light on why you shouldn’t shut the door on a career in sales.

1)      Let’s consider sales for what it really is – account management, relationship building, and business development.  If you have a knack for working with people, love the idea of not being at a desk 24/7 and might want to own your own business, then maybe sales is for you.  Take a look at the job descriptions for sales positions in OrangeLink see if they are a fit for you!

2)      Not ALL sales positions are commission-based!  This is why it is so important to do your research into company-specific sales postings.  Many employers will offer their staff starting salaries with the potential to earn more.  Even starting salaries for entry-level sales positions are higher than perceived – according to Indeed.com’s salary calculator, the average salary for an entry-level sales representative in New York City is $59,000.

3)      The job outlook is good!  A recent article from US News listed sales manager and representative as one of the “hot jobs” that will be hiring this year. (We can’t disagree either – look at the positions employers are hiring for at the upcoming Spring Career Expo!)   This isn’t a new trend either; CNBC reported that sales was one of ‘The 10 Jobs Most in Demand in 2011.’

So before you completely shut out an opportunity in sales, I encourage you to do some more research.  Talk to the employers at the Career Fair hiring for sales positions, connect with alumni on ‘CuseConnect (through LinkedIn) who have started their careers in sales, and attend Career Services events such as ‘Sales Forecast: Successful’ on February 23 (6 p.m., Hall of Languages Room 114) to hear what working in sales is REALLY all about from the people who know best.

Career Services in Los Angeles: Check out who we met!

By Kim Brown

If you follow us on Twitter, you know that several of us from the @CareerSU team were out in Los Angeles last week, working to make some awesome connections with employers and Syracuse University alumni.

Sue Casson (@smcasson), our Associate Director of Employer Relations and Shannon Feeney (@orange_spice), our Employer Relations Coordinator were on the trip – and I went along too!

Our Employer Relations team is really working hard to connect you with the employers you’ve told us you’d like to see on campus.

A fun intersection at Disney in LA!

We visited several employers in LA, including Activision Blizzard, Disney, Pelican Products, Mattel, Creative Artists Agency, Guitar Center, Robinson Helicopter, and more.

We also stopped in at Nickelodeon Animation and are VERY excited to announce that, for the first time ever, @NickAnimation will be recruiting at SU. Don’t miss them when they visit for our Career Fair in February!

Visiting the new SU in LA campus was a real treat. 41 students are studying out there, with 41 amazing internships! I was able to teach them some of them the ins and outs of LinkedIn, which was certainly a lot of fun. Now they have the tools they need to turn those internships into full-time jobs, which Andrew Graham also gave us some great advice on in this earlier blog post!

A highlight of our trip was being able to see a taping of Leno, thanks to SU grad Matt Curran, who works for NBC Universal as Director of Talent Relations and Community and Corporate Affairs. If there’s one thing we confirmed on this trip, it’s that Syracuse University alumni have the most amazing jobs – and are so willing to help our students get to where they are, offering great advice along the way. The SU network is second to none.

Check out some of the videos we shot in Los Angeles for our Career Services YouTube Channel. We’ve posted several new ones! Look for:

Stacy Small, Newhouse 1991, Owner of Elite Travel International

Linda DiMeglio, Newhouse, Entertainment Sales Manager at LA’s InterContinental Hotel

John Campisi, Newhouse 1990, Film Agent at Creative Artists Agency

Michael Franceschi, VPA 2001, Supervising Animator at Nickelodeon Animation

Amy Taylor, VPA 1999, Character FX TD at DreamWorks Animation

Mike Stern, VPA 2000, Character Animator at DreamWorks Animation

Wade Ryer, VPA 1997, Character TD at DreamWorks Animation

Sandy Prisbell, VPA 2002, Designer of Barbie Consumer Products at Mattel

Check out this advice from Newhouse alumna (magazine major) Stacy Small (@elitetravelgal)!

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFazchvZcUI&feature=player_profilepage]

Are you planning to move to Los Angeles? What other companies would you like to see recruiting graduates of Syracuse University?

If I could write a letter to my 18 year old self…

Organized by Tracy Tillapaugh

While crowd-sourcing knowledge a few weeks ago, I received some great responses on Twitter to the question, “what would you tell your 18-year-old self?”

I asked people to tweet their responses to me. Here’s what some of our SU alumni, staff and community members had to say!

Career Services' Kim Brown as a teenager, pictured here with Katie Couric (who had hair extensions!)

@kimincuse: Katie Couric’s job isn’t so great. Seek fulfillment and follow your heart.

@lauraaamac: “Rivers know this: there is no hurry. We shall get there some day.” -Pooh

@orange_spice:  don’t worry, college will be so much better than HS. Take advantage of everything at SU. Oh yea, start saving money!

@PJASchultz: Do what you want to do, not just what others expect.

@stefnoble: Start making a financial plan for the future now.

@SunnyinSyracuse: “choose summer internships instead of several retail jobs” “be involved in many different communities”

@wrbeard: Don’t wait 5 years to grow some confidence. Believe in your self.

@zbdaddy: Just try it! And figure out what you want to do and study for it.

What would you tell your 18 year old self?

The best career advice I ever received was…

Our Career Guide has advice too!

Compiled by Tracy Tillapaugh

If you’re reading this post, you most likely follow @CareerSU on twitter, and maybe you even follow me, @tracytilly. If you do, then you probably saw some questions that I posted a few weeks ago. While the original idea was to turn some crowd-sourced tweets into some suggestions for the Class of 2015, I received requests to share the info with everyone else too… so without further ado…

The best career advice I ever received was…

@cmnoguer I would say get out there, get involved and don’t be afraid of failure or rejection. Think of what you want to look back to.

@colormelauren: to use @LinkedIn!

@dgreichert: Don’t pepper your resume and hope for a bite. Research each company and tailor the resume to each specifically.

@dkaps89:  For freshmen: Start networking early & never stop. It’ll pay off when you’re job/internship hunting (or even when you’re not)

@joannagiansanti: It sounds hokey now, but when the book came out, “Do what you love and the money will follow” really rang true.

@kimincuse: “wheresoever you go, go with all your heart.” Confucius was smart… definitely applies to career!

@muruganpandian: Never stay in one place too long; especially when the opportunities to grow have evaporated.

@SyrMichael:  The best career advice I ever received was <— find something rewarding rather than focus on $$

@tjbasalla: chase the dream job, but find the career that gives you the best reality

Thank you to all of our contributors! What else would you add?

VLOG: Social Media and the Job Search with Alyssa Henry

By Tracy Tillapaugh

Syracuse University iSchool graduate student Alyssa Henry has been using Twitter for several years. She has had some great successes using Twitter and offers her tips to current students on what to tweet and how it can help with their career goals. Watch her discuss her Twitter strategies with Career Consultant Tracy Tillapaugh. Connect with @AlyssaHenry.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyQW3w9nzb0&w=560&h=315]

How has social media helped in your career development?

5 Ways to Leverage Twitter for Career Fair Success

by Rodney Fleming, SU ’13

Photo by The Daily Orange

So you want a job? Join the crowd – or don’t. With a few Twitter techniques, you can stand out from the masses and find success at your next career fair.

Do Your Homework
Going to a Career Fair is all about networking with potential employers. Why not get ahead of the game? Career Services offers lists of companies attending the fairs well in advance. Scout out the companies that are relevant to you and follow them on Twitter. Many larger companies such as Pepsi have their own job handles (@PepsiCoJOBS) that are there specifically for you to ask career questions.

Increase credibility and accountability
Take it a step further. Tweet at the companies you plan to speak with at the fair, expressing your enthusiasm for meeting their recruiters. Include your university’s Twitter handle and any other handles that make your tweet more credible. This not only shows you’re taking meeting them seriously but also makes them more accountable in responding.

Dialogue is Key
In my experience, it’s not difficult to find a few of the company’s PR and recruitment employees. A simple Twitter search “PR for X Company” can do wonders in the People Results. Drop these individuals a line that seeks a response. It’s great to express enthusiasm (as mentioned above) but when dealing with specific people, it’s better to create dialogue. Ask them how they got started with the company or what part of the company they work in. Their response will likely lead to further connections and helpful tips for securing the position.

Think of the Career Fair as an Aid
Now that you’ve built up steady conversations with companies via Twitter, apply the knowledge you’ve acquired to propel your conversations with their recruiters at the Career Fair. If you haven’t received a response from anyone in the company yet via Twitter, the recruiters might be able to give you their contact information. Use the fair as a place to ask detailed questions that won’t fit in 140 characters.

Follow Up
After meeting with recruiters at the career fair, use their business cards to seek them out online. Now that you’ve talked with companies and found those that truly pique your interest, let them know! Tweet at them along with a bit of what you talked about and that you’re interested. As mentioned before, be sure to include the handles of their company, the university’s career center, or any others that you find to be relevant.

Keep in mind, this advice only works if you are willing to put in the effort of creating a fantastic resume (which Career Services is here for!), being honest and memorable during career fairs, and willing to spark professional conversations on Twitter. Your extra effort on Twitter may very well may be the one thing that sets you apart from countless other faces and resumes!