Job Search

More Than Just a Pay Check

More than just a paycheck-01By Emilee Smith G’16

As a student, it’s sometimes hard to imagine that school will end and that you will in fact have a job. Whether it’s a job or internship though, there are a lot of things to consider before agreeing to an employment position.

While our first thought tends to revolve around the pay involved, there are a lot of other factors to consider that should play a part in your decision-making process.

To name a few…

  1. Benefits. If you are accepting a full-time job, then you want to inquire about benefits including (but not excluded to) insurance packages, retirement, vacation days and opportunities for development, such as workshops and seminars.
  1. Personal Development. Aside from inquiring about workshops and seminars, ask yourself, will this job challenge me and enhance my career? One way to ensure a strong career trajectory is by constantly gaining new and challenging experiences. It’s OK to have 10 different jobs, but it’s not necessarily OK to work the same job 10 times.
  1. Flexibility. Assess how flexible your employer is in regards to sick days and unexpected emergencies. Also, if you are planning to have a child in the foreseeable future, ask about maternity and paternity leave.
  1. Workplace Culture. When you are interviewing with different organizations, take in your surroundings. Is this a place you can see yourself working for? Consider the atmosphere as well the way employees are interacting with one another. Also consider the company values and whether or not they align with your own.

There are many other factors that go in to accepting a job, or not. When you begin to evaluate your options and job offers ask yourself, “what’s important to me?”

These are just some of the items that you may find important in your decision about a company and job. To discuss others, call us at 315-443-3616 to schedule an appointment. 

Your Summer Reading List

Recommended Reads

By Emilee Smith G’16

Learning is not limited to inside the classroom, and summer break is a great way to catch up on some self-learning and development. We all know that reading is a great way to expand your knowledge, and reading the right materials can also help you in your career. Leadership books, in particular, can inspire you to pursue your dreams and provide advice on how to do so.

Below are a few leadership books to consider:

1. “Lean in For Graduates” by Sheryl Sandberg

After her wildly popular book “Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead,” Sandberg wrote this newer publication for recent college graduates. Aimed at young professionals, this book provides advice on resumes, interviewing, salary negotiation and how to get the most out of your first job.

2. “Outliers: The Story of Success” by Malcom Gladwell

An author of modern classics, Gladwell uses this book to influence the way you view success. Analyzing what causes people to be successful, this book can be enjoyed and appreciated by students and seasoned professionals alike.

 3.“The Wisdom of Walt: Leadership Lessons from the Happiest Place on Earth” by Jeffrey A. Barnes

Written by a college professor, this book analyzes the practices and wisdom of Walt Disney and teaches readers how to emulate Walt as a means for success. This book is especially useful for communications majors and professionals, who can learn from Walt’s storytelling techniques and ability to engage audiences.

Summer is the best time to catch up on some reading.  So take some time over the next few months to check out your local library, grab a cup of coffee and improve your career from the comfort of your couch! What books do you recommend for advancing your career?

Graduation and the Road Ahead

The road ahead

By Emilee Smith G’16

The time has come. After four years of waking up early for classes, cramming for tests and pulling all-nighters, graduation has happened! These years have been some of the most stressful but also some of the most rewarding in your life. In four short years you have underwent a journey of self-discovery, made valuable connections, and started down the path to your career.

So with graduation just passed, what should you be doing before you officially leave college behind?  Here are a few ideas…

  1. Keep networking. While this is great advice for anyone, you should especially keep networking if you have not yet secured a job or internship. The more you grow your network, the more likely you are to learn about job and internship opportunities.
  2. Keep in touch. Just because you are leaving college behind doesn’t mean you should leave your connections behind. Whether it’s friends or professors or Career Services, be sure to keep in touch with all of the people you have met and bonded with during your time here.
  3. Keep building your portfolio. Review your portfolio and make sure all of your best work is included. Have yet to start building a portfolio? Check out this article to learn where you can begin.

But aside from the habits you already know about, it’s now time to look to the future and adapt habits and practices pertinent to college graduates. These tips should get you started:

  1. Get qualified. If your career or chosen profession requires further education or certification, be sure to register for the given exams or certification programs.
  2. Join professional organizations. Does your profession have a professional society or organization that you can join? If so, research what you need to do in order to become a member.
  3. Understand your finances. In six months you will have to begin making payments on your student loans. Visit the websites of your student loan providers and gain an understanding of what you will be expected to pay each month. Looking at the numbers will help you determine a payment plan best for you.

 Although it can all seem a little overwhelming, just remember: you are a brand new Syracuse University graduate. The world is full of opportunities and you are more than prepared for whatever the career world throws your way. Be sure to celebrate, and prepare for the road ahead.

We’re here for you after you graduate as long as you can complete a phone or Skype appointment! Call 315-443-3616 to set up an appointment.

Assembling Your Portfolio

Building a portfolio

By Emilee Smith G’16

Portfolios come in all shapes and sizes. Some are digital and display designs and videos while others are presented on paper, featuring art projects or written music compositions. Looking past the differing displays and varying content, there are several pieces that every portfolio should contain.

Whether you are an art major or aspiring teacher, start thinking about how you can fill these categories and begin collecting materials. Some essential pieces include:

  1. Your resume. The resume acts as a summary and is a great way to introduce potential employers to your work and accomplishments. It sets up the experience of looking through the rest of your portfolio.
  2. Examples of your work. No matter what your major is, you already possess examples of your work. These can be projects completed in school, work produced for an internship or job or even work that you have done on your own! Your field of study will most likely dictate the format of these examples. (After all, it makes sense that an aspiring video producer would have a digital portfolio, right?)
  3. If you have certifications related to your field then you should definitely include them in your portfolio. Not sure what certificates you should pursue? Ask your professors or schedule a meeting with a career counselor!
  4. Letters of Recommendation. Letters of recommendation act as great vouchers for your skill sets and work ethic. Reach out to employers and professors, both past and present, and ask them (politely) if they wouldn’t mind writing a letter for you.
  5. Awards and Publications. When it comes to awards and publications related to your field then you should absolutely showcase them in your portfolio. This will help employers recognize just how fantastic you are!

While no two portfolios look the same, all of the strongest will contain these five categories. By gradually collecting and assembling these pieces, you will ensure that you have a spectacular showcase by graduation.

So if you haven’t already, get started right away! Opportunities can arise at any moment and you may need a portfolio sooner than you think.

Social Media as a Career Skill

Using social media to build your career

By Emilee Smith G’16

In our digital age, social media is a highly sought-after skill. Although many of us are familiar with social media on a personal level, there is much value in using the platforms in a professional manner.

But with so many platforms and an abundance of information, where do you begin? Below are 5 tips and tricks that can help you improve your social media presence and knowledge in a way that will impress your future employers:

Be Professional. Perhaps the most obvious, it is exceedingly important that you keep all of your profiles professional. Even Facebook, which most people feel is more “personal,” should demonstrate a certain level of professionalism and possess a smart narrative. One of the first things your employer will do before hiring is look you up on social media, so make sure they like what they see!

Develop Your Personal Brand. You are uniquely you! Be sure that your personal brand is consistent throughout all of your profiles. One way to do this is by keeping your voice and personality constant.

Engage. Whether it is LinkedIn or Twitter, be sure you are following the companies you are interested in and respectfully connecting with influencers in your industry. It is called social networking for a reason, after all!

Be Proactive. Certain platforms, such as Twitter and WordPress, have a tendency of intimidating new users. Don’t be afraid! The only way to improve your skills and learn is by diving in. Being proactive and having a thorough understanding of all of the major platforms will make you much more marketable after graduation.

Stay Relevant. Publications such as Smart Brief on Social Business are free subscriptions that publish the newest social media developments. Reading publications such as this not only improve your knowledge on professional social media use, but also showcase your desire to learn more about the industry and developing trends.

While sometimes overwhelming, our social world is a blessing. Never before have we been able to network, engage and learn like we can today. Embracing these tips today will undoubtedly make you a better job candidate tomorrow. So good luck, and stay social!

Post-grad Plans…and #HireOrange Opportunities!

By Kim Brown, Assistant Director, Alumni Programs

Share your news!
Share your news!

Congratulations, Class of 2015! Be proud of all that you have accomplished and excited for what’s ahead!

We’d love to share in your celebrations. What are your post-graduation plans? Are you traveling? Spending time with family? Starting a new job? Heading to grad school? Share your news with us on Twitter or Instagram using #SUGrad15.

And if you’re looking for a great job or internship opportunity, we think you’ll be thrilled to read the announcement below. Make sure to keep an eye on #HireOrange on Twitter and on the Jobs tab (click “Jobs” then “Job Discussions”) in the ‘CuseConnect group on LinkedIn!

ALUMNI:

Email or tweet us!
Email or tweet us!

Is your company hiring? Want to add a little more ORANGE to your office?

Please email a link to the job or internship description (or multiple descriptions!) to our newly created email address that is JUST for job opportunities in the Orange family. It’s hireorange@syr.edu.

That’s hireorange at syr dot edu. Exciting, huh?! 🙂

If you are willing to have our newest grads and/or fellow alumni contact you about the openings, please give us the OK in your email.

The #OrangeNetwork is incredibly strong, and we want to help you #HireOrange!

We will tweet the link using #HireOrange and will share the opportunities in our LinkedIn group, ‘CuseConnect. THANK YOU AND GO ORANGE!

How to Research Companies for #SUCareerWeek

By Magnolia Salas ’12

Explore your options during Spring Career Week
Explore your options during Spring Career Week

Syracuse University Career Week is next week! Be sure to leave a good impression on recruiters by doing your research before you step foot in Goldstein Auditorium for any of the fairs.

No matter what fair you plan on attending, take a look at what companies will be on campus recruiting. Knowing what companies will be present will help you know which companies you want to approach.

Once you have your target companies, take a look at their available positions (you can do that right through OrangeLink by clicking on the company you’re interested in). We provide an overview of the company, their available positions, and even their website to help you prepare. Once you’ve figured out what positions they are hiring for and if those positions match your skills and interests, it’s time to dig a bit further into the company by:

Visiting their website
It’s a good idea to visit the company’s website and to get to know the culture of the company to know if it aligns with where you would like to work. Want more research ideas? Check out our researching companies’ page on our website. We provide links to Vault, WetFeet, and GlassDoor which can all aid in your getting a better understanding of a company.

Looking through their social media
You can get a good idea of their culture by reading their blog, as well as checking out their Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Facebook pages. Not sure what to keep an eye out for? See what articles they post, if they provide any advice and insights into their company or their staff and what makes a good candidate. Sometimes companies even host Twitter chats where you can get even more insight.

Reaching out to alumni and contacts in the company
Feeling bold? If you know someone who works at the company of your choice or will be on campus recruiting, reach out to them and ask them some questions about the company to gain more insights. You can even do a LinkedIn search via the Alumni tool and research alumni who work in the industry or company, as well.

As you do your research, write down questions you have about the company, opportunity, or industry to ask the recruiter during the fair or in a follow-up e-mail. In addition, continue building rapport with a company by attending an information session if they host one.

Good luck with your research and we hope to see you at the Career Fair on February 3 taking place in Goldstein Auditorium (Schine) from 12:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.!

Starting your first-year career!

By Shannon Andre and Tracy Tillapaugh

Discover & Explore ... First-Year Career

Welcome to Syracuse University, class of 2018! We hope your transition to college has been fun, exciting, and full of new experiences so far. We know the term “career” may sound intimidating for some and it may be the last thing on your mind since you are just starting your college experience, but it doesn’t have to be. Essentially, exploring your future career starts now!  The decisions you make, the experiences you gain, and the people you connect with during your time here will all impact the next step in your journey after college…and Career Services is here to help!

At Career Services we want to help you early in your career development, and that can start as soon as you want it to.  If you are looking to discover more about yourself and your work style, explore options when choosing your academic major, build your first resume, or start your internship search, we encourage you to come visit us. We are also hosting the following events to help you explore your first-year career:

True Colors Workshop – Tuesday, Oct. 21 – 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. – 115 Hall of Languages *RSVP in OrangeLink required; must be present for entire session

  • Why attend?  True Colors is a FUN workshop that offers insight into your personality and communication style. Learning this early on in your career can help you understand the differences between others’ ways of communicating; ultimately leading to more meaningful professional and personal relationships. Great for working in teams, building leadership skills, and identifying preferred work environments.
Major Mixer Panel & Discussion
Last year’s Major Mixer & Panel

Major Mixer & Panel Discussion – Tuesday, Oct. 28 – 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. – Career Services, 235 Schine *RSVP in OrangeLink appreciated as refreshments will be served

We hope to see you soon!

Experience the Power of the #OrangeNetwork at SUccess in the City!

By Kim Brown, Assistant Director of Alumni Programs

Classes are over and that means the start of our annual SUccess in the City networking events, hosted by our Office of Alumni Relations, with support from Career Services. Searching for a job or internship? Looking for new professional contacts? Anxious to brush up on your networking skills? Then you definitely don’t want to miss our SUccess in the City events.

A photo from one of our past SUccess in the City events!
A photo from one of our past SUccess in the City events!

First up is Syracuse/Central New York on Monday, May 5th. In addition to our amazing advisors, several Central New York companies that are currently hiring will join us on: Eric Mower + Associates, Good Monster, O’Brien & Gere, ShoreGroup, and Terakeet will all be there. 40 Below Syracuse will also have a table at the event and they can provide you with a wealth of information on living and working in Central New York.

Established in your career and interested in attending as an alumni advisor to offer career advice to our students and young alumni? Please e-mail Tina Casella in our Office of Alumni Relations: tscasell@syr.edu.

If you’re a student or Generation Orange (years ’04 – ’14) alum interested in networking with our established alumni, it’s easy to register by clicking on this link.

We start in Central New York, but also host events in several other cities throughout the summer. Here are the dates we have lined up so far, so mark your calendars and stay tuned for more information!

Syracuse/CNY: May 5
Philadelphia: May 29
Boston: June 3
DC: June 4
New York: June 23, 24, 25 (alumni only, different industries TBD on each night)
Denver: July 23 (not an official SITC, but I will be there for a conference and we are doing a joint networking evening for alumni of several schools)
Atlanta: July 23
Miami: July 24
San Francisco: TBD, likely August
Chicago: TBD, likely August

We are not doing a SUccess in the City LA this year, but we will be offering several career programs for alumni in June through SUinLA. Kelly Barnett, Tracy Tillapaugh, Mike Cahill and I will be in LA from June 7-11 offering programs on career transitions, LinkedIn, and what recruiters look for when searching for candidates. Stay tuned for more information on those!

And finally, we are trying something new this year for SUccess in the City and are building websites for each city, featuring the advisors that our students and Generation Orange (years ’04-’14) young alumni networkers can expect to meet at the events. Here’s the one we built for Central New York: MEET OUR ADVISORS.

I look forward to seeing you at a SUccess in the City event this summer!

5 Valuable Tips from Career Crash Course

By Danchen Zhou, G’14, Career Services Public Relations Intern

Danchen Zhou, public relations intern at Career Services.
Danchen Zhou, M.S. ’14, Career Services Public Relations Intern

On Friday, March 28, Syracuse University Career Services hosted a crash course on campus providing students with five career-focused workshops.  Presenters were recruiters from IBM, JPMorgan Chase, Northwestern Mutual, O’Brien & Gere, and U.S. Secret Service.  Here are some of the most valuable tips and insights regarding resume writing, personal branding, networking, interviewing, and financial management-

1.  Resumes: “Just a tiny little minute, but eternity is in it.”*
The recruiting manager from JPMorgan Chase said he would not spend more than one minute reviewing a resume. With only one minute, it’s important to learn how to tell a whole story explaining why you are a good fit for the position on a one-page resume. Also, use numbers to show the outcome and impact of your experiences. Finally, proofread your resume. Make sure your resume is typo-free, which indicates that you are a detailed-oriented person.

2.  Personal Branding: Make yourself stand out and be your own boss.
Take a few minutes to think and write down the strengths that make you stand out. If you have trouble identifying your strengths, ask your friends who know you well, or utilize some online tools, such as StrengthFinder 2.0. Once you realize your strengths, manage yourself like a boss manages its company. Take ownership of your career because it’s your choice where you lead your own path.

Students in J. P. Morgan Chase's resume presentation.
Student listen to advice from JPMorgan Chase about building effective resumes during the Career Crash Course.

3.  Networking: Don’t just take – give.
Whether you are searching for a job, or you are trying to connect with an alumnus, a common mistake is that you emphasize what they can offer you.  But why don’t you try to think about what you can give to them instead? You have connections and some information that matters to them, too. In a way, the networking process should be beneficial for both of you.

4.  Interviewing: Bring out your thoughts that can add value to the company.
The representative from IBM talked about the importance of doing research before the interview. For instance, reading balance sheets of any publicly-traded company can help you learn more about their business strategies and then you could reference this information during an interview. It’s also a way to take charge of the interview by offering your own thoughts.

5.  Financial Management: Start early and have a plan.
The representative from Northwestern Mutual shared a point that rich people get rich because they stay away from debt. To eliminate the amount of loans and avoid a poor credit score, you need to start planning your finances even while you are still in college.  The first thing is to determine what you need rather than what you want. Mint is a good App to record and calculate your expenses so that you are aware where your money has gone.  It will also help you establish a long-term strategic plan for savings. In addition, you need to familiarize yourself with financial policies and procedures, such as 10-99 Form, W-4 Form, and W-2 Form.

*Benjamin Mays Poem God’s Minute