Employer Relations

The Most Future-Proof Career Advice Ever

Marina will take over @WorkingOrange on Thursday, October 22.

By Marina Zarya, ’11; G ’13, Time Inc., Video Producer, Branding + Culture

Now that I’ve got your attention with my very-catchy headline, I’ll warn you that the actual advice part of this post will be underwhelming.

Ready?

My advice to you, eager Syracuse University student, is BE KIND.

Yes, that’s it. The job you’ll have soon does not exist yet, and your skills will keep evolving to meet market demands. What won’t change is how you should treat people. And if this is the part where you’re clicking off the page, that’s OK, you’ve read the most important part and I hope it sticks. If you’re enjoying my snippy prose, you’ll be pleased to note that I’ve prepared a few examples to illustrate what I mean.

/bē/ verb; Exist
/kīnd/ adjective; Of Kin, gracious, congenial, altruistic, accommodating

Put the two words together and they mean to exist in empathy, act with integrity, humility, and grace. This is a way of being. A state of mind that everyone is capable of tapping into and effectively living in. Please don’t misinterpret this as a suggestion to be lovey-dovey 100% of the time or to let people walk over you.

“Be Kind” doesn’t mean “Be Nice”. Nice guys (or gals) finish last for a reason. Niceness is short-lived and stems from a need for immediate approval (and therefore comes from insecurity). Niceness implies an alternative (usually selfish) agenda, and is a disingenuous approach to relationships. Kindness is being aware of others; their feelings, needs, and time. It means being confident in your ability to empathize, or help if need be. It means adding value to interactions and relationships, not taking away from them by being self-serving. Here are a few ways to do this.

Be Kind:

  1. To *everyone* you meet.

As far as your career is concerned, you just never know where you’ll see the person again. Every single job or freelance gig I’ve ever had (including the one in which I decorated cupcakes in a bakeshop window during a summer in high school), I got because I was kind to someone, not realizing they held a key to my future employment.

My favorite quote on this subject is one that I learned of in grad school by the great Dr. Maya Angelou: “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Be kind to your teammates. People love working with kind people, and certainly remember them when other co-working opportunities come up.

As I’m sure you’re well aware, networking is the utmost important part of finding work. Interpret this as your chance to be kind. For one, be kind enough to get the person’s name and position right when you email them. Be kind to follow up, to demonstrate that you appreciated a new connection’s time. Be kind and do your research – understanding the person’s background will lead to a productive conversation and no wasted time. Mostly, be genuinely interested in what they’re doing, and don’t start the relationship with “I’m looking for a job at your company”.

  1. To yourself.

I learned the hard way. As the former reigning queen of caffeinated all-nighters in Bird Library and Newhouse Photo Labs, I can attest to the severely negative impacts of disrespecting your body’s needs for sleep, healthy food and exercise. I won’t preach too much on this point, for fear of sounding like a hypocrite. Part of being a productive adult is learning to manage the fine balance of your own well being, whatever combination of factors it is for you. This is probably harder than finding a job, but is crucial to your success. Science (and Arianna Huffington) suggest that getting enough sleep is the most important thing you can do to take care of your brain.

“Be kind” applies to negative self-talk, too. Yes, we all fall back on deadlines, procrastinate doing laundry, or forget to send emails. These things happen. Guilt-tripping yourself over past indiscretions or behavioral patterns that you may have inadvertently formed will not help you change them. In fact, bad-mouthing yourself in your head activates your brain’s reward center, making your biological self think that you’re having a great time beating yourself up – making the feedback loop of negativity a “fun”​ habit.

  1. Online. 

Just because you don’t see the person you are writing to does not mean that you don’t have to be kind. Write carefully thought-out emails that get right to the point, and if something is too long for an email, pick up the phone (old school, I know). Being kind online also means being kind to your image online – when you’re job-searching, recruiters will rifle through your tweets, Instagram posts, and anything really. Do yourself justice by portraying your professional self accurately.

     4. To your community. 

In the near future, you’ll be in a position to offer career guidance, or recommend a classmate for a role you see opening up at your company. Be kind. Pay it forward.

Speaking of which, current juniors and seniors should apply to my company’​s (Time Inc.) Summer Internship & Fellowship Programs. The preferred deadline is December 1, which is sooner than you think.

Graduating seniors and grad students should check out the Careers page. We’re constantly looking for new talent to join the company.

​We also post frequent updates and job alerts on InstagramLinkedIn, and Twitter, keep in touch with us there!

————————————————————

Marina Zarya works at Time Inc. as the Video Producer for Branding + Culture. She did both her BS and MS at S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, in Advertising and Multimedia, Photography and Design, respectively. While at Syracuse University she was General Manager at WERW Real College Radio, an Engagement Fellow, Remembrance Scholar, News21 Fellow and Bayliss Scholar.

Experience the Power of the #OrangeNetwork at SUccess in the City!

By Kim Brown, Assistant Director of Alumni Programs

Classes are over and that means the start of our annual SUccess in the City networking events, hosted by our Office of Alumni Relations, with support from Career Services. Searching for a job or internship? Looking for new professional contacts? Anxious to brush up on your networking skills? Then you definitely don’t want to miss our SUccess in the City events.

A photo from one of our past SUccess in the City events!
A photo from one of our past SUccess in the City events!

First up is Syracuse/Central New York on Monday, May 5th. In addition to our amazing advisors, several Central New York companies that are currently hiring will join us on: Eric Mower + Associates, Good Monster, O’Brien & Gere, ShoreGroup, and Terakeet will all be there. 40 Below Syracuse will also have a table at the event and they can provide you with a wealth of information on living and working in Central New York.

Established in your career and interested in attending as an alumni advisor to offer career advice to our students and young alumni? Please e-mail Tina Casella in our Office of Alumni Relations: tscasell@syr.edu.

If you’re a student or Generation Orange (years ’04 – ’14) alum interested in networking with our established alumni, it’s easy to register by clicking on this link.

We start in Central New York, but also host events in several other cities throughout the summer. Here are the dates we have lined up so far, so mark your calendars and stay tuned for more information!

Syracuse/CNY: May 5
Philadelphia: May 29
Boston: June 3
DC: June 4
New York: June 23, 24, 25 (alumni only, different industries TBD on each night)
Denver: July 23 (not an official SITC, but I will be there for a conference and we are doing a joint networking evening for alumni of several schools)
Atlanta: July 23
Miami: July 24
San Francisco: TBD, likely August
Chicago: TBD, likely August

We are not doing a SUccess in the City LA this year, but we will be offering several career programs for alumni in June through SUinLA. Kelly Barnett, Tracy Tillapaugh, Mike Cahill and I will be in LA from June 7-11 offering programs on career transitions, LinkedIn, and what recruiters look for when searching for candidates. Stay tuned for more information on those!

And finally, we are trying something new this year for SUccess in the City and are building websites for each city, featuring the advisors that our students and Generation Orange (years ’04-’14) young alumni networkers can expect to meet at the events. Here’s the one we built for Central New York: MEET OUR ADVISORS.

I look forward to seeing you at a SUccess in the City event this summer!

Agents of C.A.R.E.E.R.

By Shannon Feeney Andre, Assistant Director

Your mission, if you choose to accept it, is to better connect Career Services with the student body.

Career Services Student Ambassador ProgramCareer Services is looking for students to join the Student Ambassador Program for the 2015-16 academic year.  The Student Ambassador Program brings together an elite group of students with diverse talents that are interested in assisting their peers as they navigate the career development process and engaging in the employer relations activities on campus.  Student Ambassadors act as the official liaisons between the Career Services office and the student body.  Ambassadors do this by providing feedback on any new ideas for Career Services’ programs and events, promoting and publicizing events and services, and serving as a role model and resource for their peers.  While serving as a Student Ambassador, your assignments could range from volunteering at an employer event, to participating in a focus group, to providing suggestions on marketing (and more!).

For students interested in gaining campus leadership experience, helping their peers, and marketing the work of Career Services, the Student Ambassador Program is for you!

Do you have what it takes?  Then apply via OrangeLink today (Job #74079).  Candidates need to submit a resume and cover letter explaining why they want to join the team.  The deadline to apply is July 1st.

*Updated to reflect new dates

5 Valuable Tips from Career Crash Course

By Danchen Zhou, G’14, Career Services Public Relations Intern

Danchen Zhou, public relations intern at Career Services.
Danchen Zhou, M.S. ’14, Career Services Public Relations Intern

On Friday, March 28, Syracuse University Career Services hosted a crash course on campus providing students with five career-focused workshops.  Presenters were recruiters from IBM, JPMorgan Chase, Northwestern Mutual, O’Brien & Gere, and U.S. Secret Service.  Here are some of the most valuable tips and insights regarding resume writing, personal branding, networking, interviewing, and financial management-

1.  Resumes: “Just a tiny little minute, but eternity is in it.”*
The recruiting manager from JPMorgan Chase said he would not spend more than one minute reviewing a resume. With only one minute, it’s important to learn how to tell a whole story explaining why you are a good fit for the position on a one-page resume. Also, use numbers to show the outcome and impact of your experiences. Finally, proofread your resume. Make sure your resume is typo-free, which indicates that you are a detailed-oriented person.

2.  Personal Branding: Make yourself stand out and be your own boss.
Take a few minutes to think and write down the strengths that make you stand out. If you have trouble identifying your strengths, ask your friends who know you well, or utilize some online tools, such as StrengthFinder 2.0. Once you realize your strengths, manage yourself like a boss manages its company. Take ownership of your career because it’s your choice where you lead your own path.

Students in J. P. Morgan Chase's resume presentation.
Student listen to advice from JPMorgan Chase about building effective resumes during the Career Crash Course.

3.  Networking: Don’t just take – give.
Whether you are searching for a job, or you are trying to connect with an alumnus, a common mistake is that you emphasize what they can offer you.  But why don’t you try to think about what you can give to them instead? You have connections and some information that matters to them, too. In a way, the networking process should be beneficial for both of you.

4.  Interviewing: Bring out your thoughts that can add value to the company.
The representative from IBM talked about the importance of doing research before the interview. For instance, reading balance sheets of any publicly-traded company can help you learn more about their business strategies and then you could reference this information during an interview. It’s also a way to take charge of the interview by offering your own thoughts.

5.  Financial Management: Start early and have a plan.
The representative from Northwestern Mutual shared a point that rich people get rich because they stay away from debt. To eliminate the amount of loans and avoid a poor credit score, you need to start planning your finances even while you are still in college.  The first thing is to determine what you need rather than what you want. Mint is a good App to record and calculate your expenses so that you are aware where your money has gone.  It will also help you establish a long-term strategic plan for savings. In addition, you need to familiarize yourself with financial policies and procedures, such as 10-99 Form, W-4 Form, and W-2 Form.

*Benjamin Mays Poem God’s Minute

It's Madness!

By Shannon Feeney Andre, Assistant Director

NCAA basketball teams aren’t the only ones immersed in March Madness – Career Services is too!  Every March and early April, employers will visit our campus to conduct interviews and in some cases make offers to students for internship and full-time Tournament Bracketopportunities.  The on-campus recruiting process can sometimes be overwhelming and unfamiliar to students, so here we use some bracketology to help explain…

Regular Season – Employers are assessing students’ skills, aptitude, and potential during events like career fairs, information sessions, meet and greets, and workshops.  Employers may start to identify potential top seeds for their roles.  These interactions will factor into the decisions employers make later on after resumes are submitted.

Breaking the Bubble – Employers will assess resumes and the applicant pool to make selections on the candidates they would like to interview.  Depending on the number of slots they can fill, not all applicants will make it to the on-campus interviews.

The First RoundThose selected from the applicant pool will interview on-campus during the first preliminary round.

Being Sweet & EliteOften times, employers will conduct more than one interview, especially with a stellar candidate pool.  The candidates that make it past the second round could likely face new interviewers, some they may have never met before during the regular recruiting season.

Final FourAs employers narrow down their top selections, there will only be a few candidates left to consider.  The next phase could also include an interview with one of the leaders in the company or organization, such as a vice president, hiring manager, or department head.

ChampionshipThere can only be one winner in the NCAA basketball tournament, but there can always be multiple hires!  If you receive the offer, congratulations on a great job-hunting season!

This process does not have to be madness; in fact, Career Services can make it much easier!  If you are looking for a job or internship and need some help, stop by our office during drop-ins or schedule an hour-long appointment with one of our career counselors by calling 315.443.3616 or signing up via OrangeLink.

 

#GECuse: Advice from SU Alumni at GE

General Electric is taking over the SU campus this week! On Wednesday, September 11, GE will be here to connect with students and share information on their leadership development programs.

GE will host tables in various academic buildings from 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m., conduct office hours in Career Services (235 Schine) from 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., and conclude with a major kick-off event in 304ABC (upstairs, Schine Student Center) from 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.  You’ll also hear from SU alumni all week on @WorkingOrange!

In preparation for GE Day, four SU alumni share their tips for success:

Matt Benvie ’08 – Public Relations and Psychology – Communication Leadership Development Program

  1. Writing ability and interpersonal skills are two of the most important skills for communicators. Two books you need to read over and over:
    • On Writing Well by William Zinsser. I’m not a great writer. You’re not a great writer. Regardless of your chosen profession, you’ll be expected to communicate with clarity and brevity. No one wants to read a five-paragraph email that could have been three sentences. Academic writing and “real world” writing are two completely different animals. Please read this book as soon as possible.
    • How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie. Fair or not, many of our elders view millennials in a less than favorable light. This will be your biggest challenge to overcome in your first few months on the job. You can whine about it, or you can proactively address the stigma by incorporating Carnegie’s lessons into your work and personal interactions. Thank me later!
  2. Whatever job you accept after graduation, learn everything you can about the history of your chosen industry, not just the company where you work. Why? Institutional knowledge = instant credibility.
  3. I’ll be crushed for this, but networking is overrated. Focus on perfecting your communication skills and building your resume, then worry about your network. Good managers and companies want the best talent. For me, a superior resume and work portfolio beats a connection every day of the week. I like helping people I know, but I love hiring the best talent. Why worry about my network when my work is all over the net?

Mike_GEMichael Jones ’09 – Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Management – Edison Engineering Development Program

  1. GO ABOVE AND BEYOND what is asked.  Exceeding expectations as an early engineer is critical to gain visibility and show the required dedication to excel.
  2. LEAD in all aspects.  Lead on small projects, lead on big projects.  Ownership is how you get to put your name to impactful projects.
  3. ASK WHY, don’t just agree.  New engineers won’t have the answers…and that’s ok!  Ask why you’re assuming this value or why there are advantages to the conventional design.  The more you understand the background, the sooner you can understand the implications and levers in problem solving.
  4. GET EXCITED always.  Passion in what you do is critical to happiness and success.  If you don’t love what you do, find what does make you happy.  Engineering is everywhere, in everything.  Love what you do.

Rima_GERima Rana ’13 – Accounting and Finance – Financial Management Program

  1. Be a hard worker and go the extra mile. Don’t settle for just doing what’s expected or requested of you; stop and think about what the real objective of the assignment is, and provide more insight, more research, more value.
  2. Do not be afraid to ask questions! People expect that you know very little about your job since you just started so speak up and ask questions and there is no such thing as a dumb question. Keep asking yourself why? until you really understand and have a good grasp.
  3. Build your mentality to network with people within your department and the company overall regardless if they are senior leaders or day to day professionals.
  4. Take the lead whether it be on a small project for your role or an affinity group event so you can build your reputation and make an impact.
  5. HAVE FUN and BE YOURSELF! It is important to create that work life balance. 🙂

Kaitlin_GEKaitlin Lambracht ’08 – Information Technology and Entrepreneurship – Information Technology Leadership Program

  1. Network as much as you can.  Talk to people.  Ask questions. You never know where your next job opportunity will come from.
  2. Get involved.  You will be quite busy with your normal work but it’s good to set aside time to help out in the community and/or get involved with program activities.  It’s both a nice break from day-to-day work and a great way to enhance your internal resume.
  3. When you interview, just be yourself.  The best thing you have going for you is your uniqueness and the set of experiences you have had to make yourself who you are today.  Use your extracurricular activity experiences to your advantage and be sure to highlight them in your interview! You have developed some of your most important skills for the workplace at your sorority, your sports team, or your favorite club.
  4. Come prepared with questions to ask your interviewers.  You will also be asked at the end for what questions you have.  Ask about what some of the first initiatives you will be working on or when you can expect to hear back from them on the results of the interview.
  5. Have your set of 3-5 stories that you can pull experiences from when asked questions during your interview.  You can likely answer all questions when referring to one of these stories that you have in your back pocket.
  6. If you have the capacity, ask for more work.  Tell your manager about a project that you feel is needed and that you are interesting in taking it on.

Thank you to our GE bloggers!  To learn more about these programs, come to the GE kick-off or follow along on @WorkingOrange.

ORANGE & BLUE: Serving and Protecting SU

By Gregory Snyder, ‘07

On September 11, 2001 at 8:46 a.m., American Airlines Flight 11 smashed into the World Trade Center’s North Tower. Completely unaware of the situation, I was sitting at a computer in my graphic design course during my junior year of high school. I enjoyed computers and design and I was beginning to lean toward pursuing a college degree in the field. As the day unfolded, my career path changed in an instant.

Officer Gregory Snyder '07 (second from right) on the day he was swore in
Officer Gregory Snyder ’07 (second from right) on the day he was sworn in

Someone in class saw the headline news on a website and brought it to everyone’s attention. My teacher turned on a television in the classroom for us to see as we continued with our work. At 9:03 a.m., United Airlines Flight 175 slammed into the South Tower before our very eyes. We were horrified. As the events of the day concluded, I knew what I wanted to spend my life doing. I wanted to be a police officer. I wanted to be the one running in and the one to help those in need. Some say law enforcement is a calling. I’m not sure this is true, but what I do know after working for six years is that it is a challenging and stressful job that will strain your personal relationships and potentially your quality of life. However, when you choose this career for the right reasons and find the department that fits you, as a complete person, there are few more rewarding professions.

After high school, I attended Syracuse University, following in the footsteps of my grandfather, brother and sister before me. I worked as a tour guide for SU and volunteered with the University 100 and enjoyed serving the University community. I bled orange for my years at Syracuse and will continue to for the rest of my life. I completed my degree in Sociology with minors in both Psychology and LGBT studies, but I continued pursuing a career in law enforcement and both my degree and college experiences made me the officer I am today.

My fiancé and I moved to Brooklyn after graduation in May of 2007 and by that July I had completed the painstaking process of written exams, oral interviews, physical fitness testing, and background checks. I then began my six months of training at the New York City Police Department Academy, an adventure and unique life experience, to say the least. After graduating the academy, I worked for another three and half years in the public housing developments in Brooklyn. The extremely high crime area was great for developing my skills and experience, but after about two years of work I knew something just wasn’t right. I loved aspects of my job, but I just knew the department wasn’t quite right for the kind of police officer I wanted to be. New York City was mind blowing, and while the pizza is unmatched, I also knew the city just wasn’t where I wanted to settle down and raise a family. I began the process of looking for a department that was a better fit to me.

In 2010, the perfect job opportunity to combine my passions appeared. As it would happen, the Syracuse University Department of Public Safety, DPS to the community, was hiring. I instantly gravitated toward the idea of returning to my alma mater to do the job I love. After going through the process, I returned to Syracuse University to work full time for the Department of Public Safety in August of 2011. The department has been a great fit for me. It has allowed me to live and work in a place I love, with a community I can relate to, and to be a police officer in a unique way that I couldn’t in New York City.

I don’t know whether or not this is the last stop for me in my law enforcement career. As with any career, I am constantly looking to improve myself and further provide for my family and our future and it is difficult to predict where that road will lead. However, the Department of Public Safety has given me a career I can enjoy and I feel rewarded every day to serve and protect this community.

Career Resources Series: Use Vault.com to Score Points with Employers

By Chuck Reutlinger, Associate Director, Career Services

“Why are you interested in us? What do you know about us? Why are you interested in this position and this career path? What are your strengths? Where do you see yourself in the future?”

Employers ask questions like these to see how much you really know about their organizations, their products or services, their work cultures, and, of course, the actual tasks, challenges and preferred qualifications of a specific job. Why? They are trying to identify that candidate who has an accurate grasp of the realities of working in a specific role; is confident that their knowledge, skills and attitude can produce desired outcomes; whose personality and work style will fit easily into their work culture; and who will be energized by the work they do now and in the future. This will be the candidate with whom they will want to form a relationship and to whom they will gladly make an offer.

VaultIn order to properly impress an employer, motivated job seekers have come to depend on a number of resources that capture and publish information on industries, employers, specific careers, and the tactics that employers use to evaluate candidates in the various stages of consideration.  Foremost among these resources is Vault.com.  Through its various profiles and lengthy guides, Vault provides the kind of information that networkers, cover letter writers and interviewees can use to compete successfully for an offer of a job or an internship. Familiarity with such information has become an employer’s expectation of their best candidates.

For the general public visiting Vault’s web site, some information is presented free of charge but most of the truly valuable information carries a cost.  Fortunately for students, Vault makes arrangements for colleges and universities to pay an annual fee that affords their students access to a great deal more crucial insider information on industries, careers, employer cultures, preferred qualifications, interviewing styles and formats, and much more. Syracuse has such an arrangement whereby students can log on to Vault through a Syracuse portal, set up their own accounts on Vault, and use the resources without the restrictions that non-Syracuse users would encounter.

Access Vault via the Syracuse University portal and create your account using your @syr.edu email address.

Counselors at SU Career Services can help students to grasp how Vault information can help them.  Resources similar to Vault include Wet Feet and Glass Door although SU does not currently have specific arrangements for student usage.

Career Fair's Over: Now What?

In this short video, Associate Director of Employer Relations Sue Casson shares some quick pointers on how to follow up with recruiters now that Career Fair is over!

This two-minute video is worth watching if you’re curious about the next steps to take.

We hope you had a wonderful experience at our Spring 2013 Career Fair!

Click the link:
Sue Casson on Career Fair Follow-Up

 

 

Prepare for the Fair! (Career Fair, that is…)

By Shannon Andre, Employer Relations Coordinator

With the Spring Career Fair less than a week away, there’s only a little time left to get ready to impress the employers visiting campus!  Here are some quick tips to help you along the way:

1)      Have an up-to-date resume.

Even Otto has a resume!
Even Otto has a resume!

Remember that your resume is a marketing tool.  Most recruiters will spend less than 10 seconds reviewing a resume.  You’ll want to make a great impression!  Spend some time reviewing the Career Services Career Guide for all the basics of building a resume.  Make sure it’s free of grammar and spelling mistakes too!  Once it’s ready, have it reviewed by one of our career counselors during 15 minute drop-ins, or visit us during Resumania on Monday, February 4.  Employer experts will review resumes from 9:00 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. on a first-come, first-served basis.

2)      Do your research.
One of the most frequent criticisms we hear from employers is that our students have not done their research when they approach the employer’s table.  Before you attend the Career Fair, it’s important to check out the employers visiting, the opportunities they have available, and to learn a little bit about the company.  Utilize resources like OrangeLink, LinkedIn, Twitter, and the company’s website to do the background research.  It will make you stand out!

3)      Practice your elevator pitch.
When you approach an employer, you’ll give them a firm handshake, introduce yourself, hand them your resume, and then have a few moments to explain why you are a great candidate for their position.  Be prepared to speak for 30 to 60 seconds about your qualifications, experiences, and goals as they relate to the position you are interested in (this is where that research is really important).  Don’t be afraid to write it down and practice!

4)      Dress for SUccess.
First impressions are key, which is why dressing the part is so important.  Make sure your clothes are ironed and appropriately cut.  Some suggestions for business dress include: dress pants, khakis, button-down shirts, collared shirts, suits, ties, skirts, and blouses.  Remember comfortable shoes too!  Check out Career Services’ Pinterest board for some examples.

If you need additional help preparing for the fair, Career Services is hosting two workshops this week – Wednesday, January 30 from 5:45 – 6:45 p.m. and Friday, February 1 from 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.  Learn how the Career Fair works, what to wear, what to bring, and how to approach employers.

We look forward to seeing you Tuesday, February 5 from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. in Flanagan Gymnasium for the Spring Career Fair!