Alumni Relations

Experience the Orange Advantage during ACC Week in NYC

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By John Boccacino ’03

Syracuse University Career Services is your lifelong partner when it comes to professional success, and the office is pleased to partner with the Syracuse University Alumni Association to bring the Orange Advantage professional development series to the metropolitan New York City area. Several events are planned March 9-10 as part of “Orange in the City” ACC Tournament Week.

The series of events will offer participants one-on-one career counseling, resume reviews, and opportunities to work on interviewing skills with Jenna Turman, assistant director of alumni programs in Career Services.

In conjunction with the Office of Alumni Engagement and assorted local alumni clubs, the Orange Advantage events will occur on the following dates:

  • Northern New Jersey: 8 a.m. Thursday, March 9 at the Eppes Essen Deli & Restaurant (105 E. Mt. Pleasant Ave., Livingston, N.J.). Cost is $10 and breakfast is included.
  • Central New Jersey: 5:30 p.m. Thursday, March 9 at the Salt Creek Grille (1 Rockingham Row, Princeton, N.J.). Cost is $10 and drinks and hors d’oeuvres are included.
  • Friends of Syracuse University (in partnership with the Office of Program Development): 12 p.m. Friday, March 10 at the Syracuse University Lubin House (11 E. 61st, New York). Cost is $10 and includes lunch and a panel discussion with Rosann Santos ’94 and Shemeka Brathwaite ’04 on the job search challenges and opportunities unique to African-American and Latino communities.
  • Big Apple Orange and Whitman NYC: 5:30 p.m., Friday, March 10 at the Lubin House (11 E. 61st, New York). Cost is $10 and drinks and hors d’oeuvres are included.

Additionally, at the Northern New Jersey, Central New Jersey, and Big Apple Orange/Whitman NYC events participants can enjoy the True Colors program, which focuses on your personality and how you interact with others in the workplace.

Career Services will also offer one-one-one career counseling and resume review sessions from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 11 at the Lubin House (11 E. 61st St., New York), and from 9-11 a.m. and 12:30-3 p.m. Monday, March 13 at the Fisher Center (19 E. 31st St., New York). These sessions are free to attend.

To register, visit cc.syr.edu/OrangeintheCity2017.

How to Stay in Touch as an Alumnus

Congrats on graduatingBy Emilee Smith G’16 and Jenna Turman

Congratulations, Class of 2016! The great thing about Career Services and Syracuse University is that our assistance doesn’t discontinue once you graduate. Our guidance, resources and time will always remain available to you, even after you walk across the stage at graduation.

Here are a few ways to keep in touch with us after you graduate…

  1. Update your contact information! Syracuse University will contact you about events in your area based on the information we have. If your address says Syracuse but you live in Washington, DC, you won’t hear about all of the events occurring in that city. Make sure to update your information each time you move to stay in touch.
  2. Check out the alumni club in your area. There are over 70 clubs in many cities throughout the world.
  3. Participate in the Alumni Webinar Series, a monthly professional and personal develop webinar presented by alumni experts in various topics. Check out the Career Services website, and follow along on social media for updates and schedules.
  4. Stay virtually connected! Follow @SUAlums on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook for up-to-date information. Also, check out @WorkingOrange to job shadow other alumni. As part of Generation Orange, graduates from the last 10 years, you have even more ways to stay connected. Follow @SUGenOrange on Twitter.

So whether you are seeking counsel immediately following graduation or considering a career change later, know that our doors are always open. Aside from stopping by in person, you can call us at 315.443.3616, to set up a phone or Skype appointment.

Orange Central: A phenomenal chance to meet alumni

By Kim Brown ’06, Assistant Director for Alumni Programs

Have you heard? Orange Central is this week! Our Office of Alumni Relations welcomes everyone to celebrate their love of Orange – and with so many alumni visiting campus, it’s an incredible opportunity for students to make amazing career connections with alumni who want to help the next generation of Orange.

TwitterOC2014

So how can you take advantage of Orange Central as a student?

Check out the list of events – and sign up to attend them. Many Orange Central events are open to students. You’ll find the whole list here. Take some time to go through it. There is, without a doubt, something for everybody! You’ll even find some events, like Slice of Orange Days, Trivia Night, and Camp ‘Cuse, that are specifically for YOU!

Don’t be afraid to say hi. Most of our alumni will be checking in at the Goldstein Alumni and Faculty Center, which is right next door to Bird Library. If you’re leaving the library and see alumni mingling around GAFC, say hello! You never know who you’ll meet, and our alumni are always thrilled to have conversations with current students. They miss SU, and you offer them a chance to live vicariously. Tell them what you love about this special place!

Offer help. For many of the alumni who come back for Orange Central, it’s been years since they were on the Syracuse University campus. Whitman is new. Ernie Davis is new. Dineen Hall is new. If you see folks looking lost, offer to help them find their way to a campus building. Again, you never know who you might meet!

Aspire to win an Arents Award. The George Arents Award is Syracuse University’s highest alumni honor, presented annually to alumni who have made outstanding contributions to their chosen fields. Check out this year’s winners, who will be awarded at Orange Central 2014, and then chart your own path to becoming an Arents Award Winner!

Hope to see you at Orange Central 2015!

*updated for Orange Central 2015

The Most Future-Proof Career Advice Ever

Marina will take over @WorkingOrange on Thursday, October 22.

By Marina Zarya, ’11; G ’13, Time Inc., Video Producer, Branding + Culture

Now that I’ve got your attention with my very-catchy headline, I’ll warn you that the actual advice part of this post will be underwhelming.

Ready?

My advice to you, eager Syracuse University student, is BE KIND.

Yes, that’s it. The job you’ll have soon does not exist yet, and your skills will keep evolving to meet market demands. What won’t change is how you should treat people. And if this is the part where you’re clicking off the page, that’s OK, you’ve read the most important part and I hope it sticks. If you’re enjoying my snippy prose, you’ll be pleased to note that I’ve prepared a few examples to illustrate what I mean.

/bē/ verb; Exist
/kīnd/ adjective; Of Kin, gracious, congenial, altruistic, accommodating

Put the two words together and they mean to exist in empathy, act with integrity, humility, and grace. This is a way of being. A state of mind that everyone is capable of tapping into and effectively living in. Please don’t misinterpret this as a suggestion to be lovey-dovey 100% of the time or to let people walk over you.

“Be Kind” doesn’t mean “Be Nice”. Nice guys (or gals) finish last for a reason. Niceness is short-lived and stems from a need for immediate approval (and therefore comes from insecurity). Niceness implies an alternative (usually selfish) agenda, and is a disingenuous approach to relationships. Kindness is being aware of others; their feelings, needs, and time. It means being confident in your ability to empathize, or help if need be. It means adding value to interactions and relationships, not taking away from them by being self-serving. Here are a few ways to do this.

Be Kind:

  1. To *everyone* you meet.

As far as your career is concerned, you just never know where you’ll see the person again. Every single job or freelance gig I’ve ever had (including the one in which I decorated cupcakes in a bakeshop window during a summer in high school), I got because I was kind to someone, not realizing they held a key to my future employment.

My favorite quote on this subject is one that I learned of in grad school by the great Dr. Maya Angelou: “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Be kind to your teammates. People love working with kind people, and certainly remember them when other co-working opportunities come up.

As I’m sure you’re well aware, networking is the utmost important part of finding work. Interpret this as your chance to be kind. For one, be kind enough to get the person’s name and position right when you email them. Be kind to follow up, to demonstrate that you appreciated a new connection’s time. Be kind and do your research – understanding the person’s background will lead to a productive conversation and no wasted time. Mostly, be genuinely interested in what they’re doing, and don’t start the relationship with “I’m looking for a job at your company”.

  1. To yourself.

I learned the hard way. As the former reigning queen of caffeinated all-nighters in Bird Library and Newhouse Photo Labs, I can attest to the severely negative impacts of disrespecting your body’s needs for sleep, healthy food and exercise. I won’t preach too much on this point, for fear of sounding like a hypocrite. Part of being a productive adult is learning to manage the fine balance of your own well being, whatever combination of factors it is for you. This is probably harder than finding a job, but is crucial to your success. Science (and Arianna Huffington) suggest that getting enough sleep is the most important thing you can do to take care of your brain.

“Be kind” applies to negative self-talk, too. Yes, we all fall back on deadlines, procrastinate doing laundry, or forget to send emails. These things happen. Guilt-tripping yourself over past indiscretions or behavioral patterns that you may have inadvertently formed will not help you change them. In fact, bad-mouthing yourself in your head activates your brain’s reward center, making your biological self think that you’re having a great time beating yourself up – making the feedback loop of negativity a “fun”​ habit.

  1. Online. 

Just because you don’t see the person you are writing to does not mean that you don’t have to be kind. Write carefully thought-out emails that get right to the point, and if something is too long for an email, pick up the phone (old school, I know). Being kind online also means being kind to your image online – when you’re job-searching, recruiters will rifle through your tweets, Instagram posts, and anything really. Do yourself justice by portraying your professional self accurately.

     4. To your community. 

In the near future, you’ll be in a position to offer career guidance, or recommend a classmate for a role you see opening up at your company. Be kind. Pay it forward.

Speaking of which, current juniors and seniors should apply to my company’​s (Time Inc.) Summer Internship & Fellowship Programs. The preferred deadline is December 1, which is sooner than you think.

Graduating seniors and grad students should check out the Careers page. We’re constantly looking for new talent to join the company.

​We also post frequent updates and job alerts on InstagramLinkedIn, and Twitter, keep in touch with us there!

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Marina Zarya works at Time Inc. as the Video Producer for Branding + Culture. She did both her BS and MS at S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, in Advertising and Multimedia, Photography and Design, respectively. While at Syracuse University she was General Manager at WERW Real College Radio, an Engagement Fellow, Remembrance Scholar, News21 Fellow and Bayliss Scholar.

Post-grad Plans…and #HireOrange Opportunities!

By Kim Brown, Assistant Director, Alumni Programs

Share your news!
Share your news!

Congratulations, Class of 2015! Be proud of all that you have accomplished and excited for what’s ahead!

We’d love to share in your celebrations. What are your post-graduation plans? Are you traveling? Spending time with family? Starting a new job? Heading to grad school? Share your news with us on Twitter or Instagram using #SUGrad15.

And if you’re looking for a great job or internship opportunity, we think you’ll be thrilled to read the announcement below. Make sure to keep an eye on #HireOrange on Twitter and on the Jobs tab (click “Jobs” then “Job Discussions”) in the ‘CuseConnect group on LinkedIn!

ALUMNI:

Email or tweet us!
Email or tweet us!

Is your company hiring? Want to add a little more ORANGE to your office?

Please email a link to the job or internship description (or multiple descriptions!) to our newly created email address that is JUST for job opportunities in the Orange family. It’s hireorange@syr.edu.

That’s hireorange at syr dot edu. Exciting, huh?! 🙂

If you are willing to have our newest grads and/or fellow alumni contact you about the openings, please give us the OK in your email.

The #OrangeNetwork is incredibly strong, and we want to help you #HireOrange!

We will tweet the link using #HireOrange and will share the opportunities in our LinkedIn group, ‘CuseConnect. THANK YOU AND GO ORANGE!

All The World’s A Stage…And Teachers Are Players, Too

Guest post by Jaimie Salkovitch ’05

Jaimie Salkovitch '05 dancing with one of her students.
Jaimie Salkovitch ’05 dancing with one of her students.

As a musical theater major at Syracuse University, I never imagined that my audience would one day be a room full of first graders from Brooklyn.

After I graduated with my B.F.A., I worked nights and spent my days auditioning for shows in New York City. I loved the theater world, but eventually I began to crave a more stable position. A desk job wasn’t for me – I wanted a career that would throw me curve balls every day, one where I could make a difference in people’s lives. Recalling my transformative experience volunteering at an inner-city school as a high school student, I decided that teaching would be just that career.

In 2008, I began working toward a master’s degree in special education at Fordham University, and a friend recommended that I apply to work for Success Academy, a growing charter school network that at the time had four elementary schools in Harlem. I was hired as an assistant teacher, and today, I am a special education teacher at Success Academy Crown Heights.

At first glance, the voice and acting classes I took at Syracuse University seem unrelated to the math and English lessons I teach today. But after seven years of teaching, I’ve found that not a day goes by when I fail to apply the lessons I learned as a musical theater student in my classroom.

When I started at Success Academy, I quickly realized that the traits that make an actor great – preparation, quick thinking, the ability to accept feedback – are the same qualities that make a teacher successful in the classroom.

When I started at Success Academy, I quickly realized that the traits that make an actor great – preparation, quick thinking, the ability to accept feedback – are the same qualities that make a teacher successful in the classroom. During productions at Syracuse, I had to improvise if I forgot a line, or if a prop was missing from the stage. Today, if a student is disruptive in class, I have to think on my feet to resolve the issue immediately – while making sure I don’t lose the attention of my young audience.

My acting career also taught me to accept feedback — a critical skill for any teacher. In the same way that directors guide their performers, Success Academy principals offer in-the-moment feedback to teachers, allowing them to improve rapidly. The trick is learning how to accept constructive criticism and incorporate it into your next lesson. As an actress, I had a lot of experience doing just that.

Today, my colleagues and I work together to ensure our scholars are meeting Success Academy’s high expectations. We all care deeply about our students and work to create a school environment where children arrive eager to learn every day.  To achieve this in my classroom, I might ask scholars who have a hard time grasping a book passage to act out a scene, so they can better understand a character’s motivations or a certain plot point.

As I collaborate with my Success Academy colleagues to improve student learning, I am always reminded of the family-like atmosphere I discovered at Syracuse University, where players worked together to give the best possible performance.

At Success Academy, I have found the perfect position for me — no school day looks exactly like the one before.  Each morning, I have an opportunity to impart a new lesson to an eager young audience. That’s an exciting and sometimes scary responsibility — but one that the stage prepared me for.

Founded in 2006, Success Academy is a free public charter school network with the dual mission of building world-class public schools across New York City and advancing education reform across the country. Success Academy operates 32 schools in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx. Admission is open to all New York City families. Students are admitted by random lottery, held each April. Across the Success Academy network of K-12 schools, 76% of students are from low-income households; 8.5% are English Language Learners, and 12% are special needs students. About 94% of students are children of color. For more information about Success Academy, go to Successacademies.org

Jaimie Salkovitch is a K-2 special education teacher at Success Academy Crown Heights in Brooklyn, New York. She graduated from Syracuse University in 2005 with a B.F.A. in musical theater and received her masters degree in special education from Fordham University in 2010.

Introducing #CuseCue on Instagram!

CareerSU1 Instagram image
By Kim Brown, ’06, Assistant Director for Alumni Programs

Can you believe it’s been two years since we launched @WorkingOrange? It’s our Twitter account featuring guest alumni tweeters sharing details of their workdays and offering advice to students and fellow alumni. We’re having a lot of fun with @WorkingOrange and today, we’re excited to announce another way our students can connect with our awesome alumni – via Instagram!

We’re calling it #CuseCue. Why #CuseCue? A cue is, simply put, a signal for action. Syracuse University alumni know the actions they took towards achieving career/life success, and students can take their cues from fellow members of our Orange family. A #CuseCue might be advice on standing out in an interview, tips on paying back college loans, thoughts on what makes a rockstar intern, insight on the most fulfilling career paths, and so much more. The goal is to keep each #CuseCue to 140 characters or less. Short and sweet advice from alumni who are the best at sharing it!

STUDENTS, here’s what to do/expect:

  • Follow @CareerSU1 on Instagram
  • Every Friday, we’ll introduce you to a new SU grad and you’ll find his/her #CuseCue in the photo’s description.
  • We’ll tag his/her Instagram, so you can connect directly with the alum, if you’d like.

ALUMNI, are you willing to share a #CuseCue?

  • Follow @CareerSU1 on Instagram
  • Email Magnolia Salas (jmsalas@syr.edu), our awesome Communications and Marketing Coordinator, with the following information:
    • Your name, SU graduation year, job title and employer
    • Your Instagram handle (if you have one and wouldn’t mind us sharing it)
    • A photo you’d like us to use on our Instagram on the day we feature your #CuseCue. It can be a cool picture of your office, a headshot, a fun photo showing your Orange personality, your SU graduation picture, you name it. Be creative if you’d like!
    • And, of course, your #CuseCue. Try to keep your advice for students/fellow alumni to 140 characters or less.

That’s it! We are excited to feature our alumni in this new way and can’t wait to read the awesome advice in each #CuseCue.

GO ORANGE!

Introducing #CuseCue on Instagram!

CareerSU1 Instagram image
By Kim Brown, ’06, Assistant Director for Alumni Programs

Can you believe it’s been two years since we launched @WorkingOrange? It’s our Twitter account featuring guest alumni tweeters sharing details of their workdays and offering advice to students and fellow alumni. We’re having a lot of fun with @WorkingOrange and today, we’re excited to announce another way our students can connect with our awesome alumni – via Instagram!

We’re calling it #CuseCue. Why #CuseCue? A cue is, simply put, a signal for action. Syracuse University alumni know the actions they took towards achieving career/life success, and students can take their cues from fellow members of our Orange family. A #CuseCue might be advice on standing out in an interview, tips on paying back college loans, thoughts on what makes a rockstar intern, insight on the most fulfilling career paths, and so much more. The goal is to keep each #CuseCue to 140 characters or less. Short and sweet advice from alumni who are the best at sharing it!

STUDENTS, here’s what to do/expect:

  • Follow @CareerSU1 on Instagram
  • Every Friday, we’ll introduce you to a new SU grad and you’ll find his/her #CuseCue in the photo’s description.
  • We’ll tag his/her Instagram, so you can connect directly with the alum, if you’d like.

ALUMNI, are you willing to share a #CuseCue?

  • Follow @CareerSU1 on Instagram
  • Email Magnolia Salas (jmsalas@syr.edu), our awesome Communications and Marketing Coordinator, with the following information:
    • Your name, SU graduation year, job title and employer
    • Your Instagram handle (if you have one and wouldn’t mind us sharing it)
    • A photo you’d like us to use on our Instagram on the day we feature your #CuseCue. It can be a cool picture of your office, a headshot, a fun photo showing your Orange personality, your SU graduation picture, you name it. Be creative if you’d like!
    • And, of course, your #CuseCue. Try to keep your advice for students/fellow alumni to 140 characters or less.

That’s it! We are excited to feature our alumni in this new way and can’t wait to read the awesome advice in each #CuseCue.

GO ORANGE!

From Modern Presidency to Providing Presidential Protection

By Kim Brown, Assistant Director for Alumni Programs

As a student at Syracuse University, Aaron Rittgers always looked forward to Modern Presidency class with Professor Margaret Susan Thompson. Little did he know that ten years later, he’d have a job that would give him a front row seat to the President of the United States, the Vice President, First Ladies, and other prominent world leaders.

Major Aaron Rittgers '03 speaks to Air Force ROTC cadets.
Major Aaron Rittgers ’03 speaks to Air Force ROTC cadets.

Rittgers is a Major in the United States Air Force. As a student at Syracuse University, he was in the Air Force ROTC. He graduated from SU in 2003 and is now Commander of the 811th Security Forces Squadron at Joint Base Andrews. What does that mean? His squadron is responsible for guarding Air Force One when it is on Andrews, for protecting Air Force Two all over the world, and for protecting the President, Vice President, First Lady, and other leaders while they are on Joint Base Andrews. That means Rittgers has some insider information on President Obama’s golf game! Andrews is one of the President’s favorite place to golf.

Major Rittgers visited campus at the end of October as part of the Alumni Speaker Series. He spoke to the Modern Presidency class, to the Air Force ROTC cadets, to a group of parents on campus for Family Weekend, and more. The timing of his trip also coincided with a visit from General Martin Dempsey, who awarded Major Rittgers with his Bronze Star Medal after a yearlong tour in Iraq. Rittgers has done seven tours and spent 1100 days in the Middle East!

Since Rittgers works so closely on protecting Air Force Two, he’s had several interactions with fellow Syracuse University alum Vice President Joe Biden. When asked about those interactions, Rittgers said that Biden is one of the most down-to-earth guys you could meet – and that the two enjoy chatting about ‘CUSE. Major Rittgers also told ROTC cadets how proud he is of them for choosing to join ROTC in a post-9/11 world.

It’s always an honor to welcome Syracuse University alumni back to campus to share their career stories, and we’re especially grateful to Major Rittgers for sharing so much of his time and talent with our students!

Orange Central: a phenomenal chance to meet alumni!

By Kim Brown ’06, Assistant Director for Alumni Programs

Have you heard? Orange Central is this week! Our Office of Alumni Relations welcomes everyone to celebrate their love of Orange – and with so many alumni visiting campus, it’s an incredible opportunity for students to make amazing career connections with alumni who want to help the next generation of Orange.

TwitterOC2014

So how can you take advantage of Orange Central as a student?

Check out the list of events – and sign up to attend them. Many Orange Central events are open to students. You’ll find the whole list here. Take some time to go through it. There is, without a doubt, something for everybody! You’ll even find some events, like Slice of Orange Days, Trivia Night, and Camp ‘Cuse, that are specifically for YOU!

Don’t be afraid to say hi. Most of our alumni will be checking in at the Goldstein Alumni and Faculty Center, which is right next door to Bird Library. If you’re leaving the library and see alumni mingling around GAFC, say hello! You never know who you’ll meet, and our alumni are always thrilled to have conversations with current students. They miss SU, and you offer them a chance to live vicariously. Tell them what you love about this special place!

Listen to Ruth Ross. Ruth graduated from Syracuse University and, after a very successful career in HR for top companies like Estee Lauder, Wells Fargo, and Charles Schwab, she’s now an author and speaker on the topic of employee engagement. What does that mean? It means finding a career you love, a job you feel passionate about that makes you want to go to work every day. Ruth is amazing, and she’s speaking to students and signing copies of her book at 3 p.m. on Friday, October 10. You don’t want to miss the chance to hear her advice!

RuthRossPostcard

Offer help. For many of the alumni who come back for Orange Central, it’s been years since they were on the Syracuse University campus. Whitman is new. Ernie Davis is new. Dineen Hall is new. If you see folks looking lost, offer to help them find their way to a campus building. Again, you never know who you might meet!

Aspire to win an Arents Award. The George Arents Award is Syracuse University’s highest alumni honor, presented annually to alumni who have made outstanding contributions to their chosen fields. Check out this year’s winners, who will be awarded at Orange Central 2014, and then chart your own path to becoming an Arents Award Winner!

Hope to see you at Orange Central 2014!