2013We asked Syracuse University alumni for some advice on what you can expect, as well as what you should do to be successful in your first year of employment after graduation. Here’s what they had to share:

On Twitter:

@KristySmorol: I would say expect to keep learning. While college classes give you a GREAT step up, hands-on learning is different

@EilishMitchell: Adjust your sleep schedule as soon as possible for a regular day. No more staying up till 2am on weekdays!

@christinelan3: Patience is key. When you first start, everything will feel like its progressing painfully slowly.

@AmeliaDeCesare: Job descriptions are constantly evolving and you should expect/offer to do anything and everything!

@SunnyinSyracuse: Be flexible, be fluid…and you’ll need help sometimes…that’s okay.

@AlyssaHenry: Don’t live & die by the job description, roles evolve as you grow into them. Don’t expect micro-management; take initiative!

From ‘CuseConnect on LinkedIn:

Michael C. Hay: Network, network, network! You can never have too many connections.

Murugan Pandian: Be daring and take risks!

Julie Weinstein: Know that there’s a reason if your manager asks you for something – a report, some numbers, some information. It’s most likely to help her/him provide information to someone else. In most cases, the more you can help your manager, the better it will be for you. Also know that there are plenty of people who want you to succeed in your job. When you succeed, your company does too!

Jason Goldberg:
* Participate in every networking group possible.
* Join a recreational club sports league and participate in all of their cost-effective social activities.
* Take on a leadership role with a local volunteer organization.
* Become an expert in whatever field you enter. Regardless of your current employment, you should start a professional blog, generate white papers, and apply for speaking positions at association conferences. The youngest component of the US professional workforce has a significant technological edge above older counterparts…use this to your advantage.
* Transition to Adulthood (i.e. go to sleep earlier, wake up earlier, no more weekday partying, stay current on all local and national news).
* Learn to find common-ground with ANYONE. No more Greek Life, no more social clubs. If you want to climb the social and corporate ladder, you must be a likable person.
* Represent your alma mater well. Syracuse University has an excellent academic reputation that makes us highly employable.

Michelle Dalton:
— Don’t be afraid to ask questions. You’re a recent grad, not someone with 20 years of hands-on experience. You’re not expected to know everything.
— Remember you were hired because you are smart and your boss saw something in you no one else had. Take the opportunity to learn everything you can about the job, the company, and the industry it’s in.
— Using shorthand when you’re texting is fine. Using shortcuts in business correspondence is not. For that matter, forget every emoticon you’ve learned.
— Jobs are hard to come by these days, but that doesn’t mean you should allow yourself to work 80 hour weeks to prove you’re dedicated. The company is investing its personnel to train you and they want their investment to pay off. Having someone burn out in the first year doesn’t do anyone any good.

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Check out additional tips from ‘CuseConnect!

Need more inspiration and direction? Here are some of the commencement speeches given to the Class of 2013. We wish you all the best!

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2013We asked Syracuse University alumni for some advice on what you can expect, as well as what you should do to be successful in your first year of employment after graduation. Here’s what they had to share:

On Twitter:

@KristySmorol: I would say expect to keep learning. While college classes give you a GREAT step up, hands-on learning is different

@EilishMitchell: Adjust your sleep schedule as soon as possible for a regular day. No more staying up till 2am on weekdays!

@christinelan3: Patience is key. When you first start, everything will feel like its progressing painfully slowly.

@AmeliaDeCesare: Job descriptions are constantly evolving and you should expect/offer to do anything and everything!

@SunnyinSyracuse: Be flexible, be fluid…and you’ll need help sometimes…that’s okay.

@AlyssaHenry: Don’t live & die by the job description, roles evolve as you grow into them. Don’t expect micro-management; take initiative!

From ‘CuseConnect on LinkedIn:

Michael C. Hay: Network, network, network! You can never have too many connections.

Murugan Pandian: Be daring and take risks!

Julie Weinstein: Know that there’s a reason if your manager asks you for something – a report, some numbers, some information. It’s most likely to help her/him provide information to someone else. In most cases, the more you can help your manager, the better it will be for you. Also know that there are plenty of people who want you to succeed in your job. When you succeed, your company does too!

Jason Goldberg:
* Participate in every networking group possible.
* Join a recreational club sports league and participate in all of their cost-effective social activities.
* Take on a leadership role with a local volunteer organization.
* Become an expert in whatever field you enter. Regardless of your current employment, you should start a professional blog, generate white papers, and apply for speaking positions at association conferences. The youngest component of the US professional workforce has a significant technological edge above older counterparts…use this to your advantage.
* Transition to Adulthood (i.e. go to sleep earlier, wake up earlier, no more weekday partying, stay current on all local and national news).
* Learn to find common-ground with ANYONE. No more Greek Life, no more social clubs. If you want to climb the social and corporate ladder, you must be a likable person.
* Represent your alma mater well. Syracuse University has an excellent academic reputation that makes us highly employable.

Michelle Dalton:
— Don’t be afraid to ask questions. You’re a recent grad, not someone with 20 years of hands-on experience. You’re not expected to know everything.
— Remember you were hired because you are smart and your boss saw something in you no one else had. Take the opportunity to learn everything you can about the job, the company, and the industry it’s in.
— Using shorthand when you’re texting is fine. Using shortcuts in business correspondence is not. For that matter, forget every emoticon you’ve learned.
— Jobs are hard to come by these days, but that doesn’t mean you should allow yourself to work 80 hour weeks to prove you’re dedicated. The company is investing its personnel to train you and they want their investment to pay off. Having someone burn out in the first year doesn’t do anyone any good.

———————————————————–
Check out additional tips from ‘CuseConnect!

Need more inspiration and direction? Here are some of the commencement speeches given to the Class of 2013. We wish you all the best!

Tags: , , ,